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Hungary criminalises rough sleeping

Parliament adopts controversial law, allowing local authorities to designate areas as out-of-bounds for homeless people.

Last Modified: 01 Oct 2013 14:34
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The PM said the law was in the 'interest of homeless people' [AFP]

Hungarian politicians have adopted a controversial law that allows local authorities to prohibit rough sleeping by the homeless.

The new law claims to protect "public order, security, health, and cultural value", but rights campaigners say the move criminalises homelessness.

Local authorities were empowered on Monday to designate areas as out-of-bounds for homeless people, as well as evict people living in huts or shacks. 

Offenders can be punished with community service, fines or even imprisonment.

Hungary's treatment of the homeless has triggered criticism from rights campaigners and international bodies including the Venice Commission, an advisory body to the Council of Europe.

Earlier this month, Human Rights Watch said such laws were an example of Budapest "undermining" EU law and human rights since Prime Minister Viktor Orban's right-wing government came to power in 2010.

Orban's office insisted that the latest law was "primarily in the interest of homeless people" Instead of staying in hostels, "they rather choose to stay in public areas where they risk freezing to death during the winter".

The government says funding for programmes and facilities helping the homeless has increased, while hostel places are adequate to cater for the homeless population - estimated at more than 4,000 in Budapest alone.

Last November, Hungary's constitutional court judged an earlier clampdown on rough sleeping was unconstitutional, but in March this year, parliament voted to amend the constitution to reinstate the restrictions.

Before Monday night's vote, several hundred homeless people and activists staged a protest outside parliament.

"This is a social issue, not a criminal one," Tessza Udvarhelyi, an activist with The City Belongs to Everyone rights group told AFP.

"It is a lie that there are enough hostel places for all, and what does exist is often not safe, clean, or dignified," she added.

Udvarhelyi said the group would turn to Hungary's rights ombudsman and president in a bid to repeal the law.

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