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UK judge rules Abu Qatada not to be deported

Radical preacher will not be sent to Jordan as UK court overrules government suggestion that he should face deportation.
Last Modified: 12 Nov 2012 17:08
Qatada was often referred to as "Osama Bin Laden's man in Europe" [Reuters]

Muslim radical preacher Abu Qatada has won his appeal against deportation from Britain to Jordan to face terrorism charges.

The decision on Monday represents a setback to the British government.

Interior Ministry officials said they strongly disagreed with the ruling.

In a statement the ministry said:"We have obtained assurances not just in relation to the treatment of Qatada himself but about the quality of the legal processes that would be followed throughout his trial.

"Indeed, today's ruling found that 'the Jordanian judiciary, like their executive counterparts, are determined to ensure that the appellant will receive, and be seen to receive, a fair retrial'.

"We will therefore seek leave to appeal [Monday's] decision."

The Special Immigration Appeals Commission on Monday blocked the deportation of Qatada, saying it was not convinced by the government's assurances that no evidence obtained through torture would be used against Abu Qatada in Jordan.

He has been referred to as a top al-Qaeda operative who had close ties to the late Osama bin Laden.

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