[QODLink]
Central & South Asia

Pakistan arrests head of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi

Malik Ishaq, leader of banned group which claimed responsibilty for recent bombing in Quetta, detained for one month.
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2013 16:43
Ishaq's arrest comes less than a week after LeJ claimed responsibility for the deadly Quetta attack [Reuters]

Malik Ishaq, leader of the banned Lashkar-e-Jhangvi group (LeJ), has been arrested by authorities in central Pakistan.

Ishaq surrendered on Friday in front of media in his home in the city of Rahim Yar Khan.

Ishaq's arrest comes less than a week after the armed group, banned since 2001, claimed responsibility for a market bombing that killed more than 80 Shias in Balochistan province.

Ashfaq Gujar, a senior police officer, said Ishaq, had been arrested on government orders and sent to a high-security jail, where he would be detained for one month under a pre-emptive law.

Ishaq was imprisoned for 14 years on charges, never proven, of killing Shias. He was released in July 2011.

He was briefly detained last year following attacks against Shias.

LeJ has targeted the Hazara ethnic minority in Quetta, the capital of Balochistan province, for several years.

134

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Your chance to be an investigative journalist in Al Jazeera’s new interactive game.
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Featured
Despite 14-year struggle for a new mosque in the second-largest city, new roadblocks are erected at every turn.
Authorities and demonstrators have shown no inclination to yield despite growing economic damage and protest pressure.
Lebanese-born Rula Ghani may take cues from the modernising Queen Soraya, but she'll have to proceed with caution.
One of the world's last hunter-gatherer tribes has been forced from the forest it called home by a major dam project.
Chinese authorities scramble to cut off information on Hong Kong protests from reaching the mainland.