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Central & South Asia

Family of dead Pakistan officer seeks probe

Kamran Faisal's family says he had torture marks on his body, rejecting postmortem report that termed death as suicide.
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2013 18:50
Faisal's death came just days after Pakistan's top court ordered the arrest of Ashraf in a corruption case [EPA]

Family of a Pakistani officer investigating a corruption case against the country’s prime minister has called for inquiry into his death.

Kamran Faisal’s family has insisted he was murdered and he had torture marks on his body, rejecting post-mortem report that termed it suicide, Pakistan-based English Daily The Express Tribune reported on Saturday.

"The final forensic report of the death will be compiled in one week, which will reveal whether Faisal took any anti-depressants pills that led to his suicide," the paper said.

The body of Faisal was found hanging from a ceiling fan in his room at a government dorm in Islamabad.

Faisal's death came days after the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf and 15 others in connection with an old corruption case that the officer was investigating.

Faisal of the National Accountability Bureau (NAB) played a main role in the graft probe until they were removed from the investigation weeks ago by Fasih Bokhari, the bureau chairman who was allegedly unhappy with their performance.

The prime minister was implicated in the case when he was minister of water and power. At the time, he oversaw the import of short-term power stations that cost the government millions of dollars but produced little energy.

Ashraf has denied the charges against him.

Pakistan's Supreme Court on Tuesday asked the NAB to arrest Ashraf and 15 others involved in the case, but Bokhari, refused, saying he does not have sufficient evidence to arrest the prime minister.

The refusal was seen as the latest clash between the government and the country's top court and has intensified the sense of political crisis in Pakistan.

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