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'Mumbai gunman' retracts confession
Mohammed Ajmal Kasab tells court in India that he was tortured while in custody.
Last Modified: 18 Dec 2009 11:22 GMT
The main station is Mumbai was one of several sites targeted during the deadly three-day siege [EPA]

A man accused of taking part in a deadly siege in the Indian city of Mumbai in 2008 has retracted his confession, claiming that police tortured him into admitting his role in the attacks.

Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, 21, told the judge in a special court on Friday that he came to Mumbai as a tourist and was arrested 20 days before the siege began.

He denies being a man photographed with an assault rifle in photographs taken during the three-day siege of Mumbai's main train station, one of several sites targeted by the gunmen.

One hundred and sixty-six people died in the attacks, in which 10 men armed with rifles stormed two luxury hotels, a Jewish centre and the train station. Nine of the gunmen were killed.

'Death' threat

Kasab said that police took him from his cell on the day the attacks started because he resembled one of the gunmen.

He claims that they shot him to make it look as if he had been involved in the attacks and re-arrested him.

Kasab said he was initially brought into police custody after wandering around the city late at night, looking for a place to stay.

His Pakistani citizenship aroused suspicion, he said.

Kasab, who earlier confessed to opening fire on people inside the station, could face the death penalty if convicted.

Source:
Agencies
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