Swat valley peace talks break down

Peace-broker accuses government of dragging its feet over adoption of the Sharia.

     Supporters of the Movement for the Enforcement of Mohammedan Law rest in Swat valley [EPA]

    Asif Ali Zardari, Pakistan's president, has said he will sign an order introducing
    sharia in the region only once peace has been fully restored.

    Government blamed

    Al Jazeera's Kamal Hyder, reporting from Islamabad, said: "Sufi Muhammad, who was the key factor in brokering a peace deal in the Swat valley ...  has blamed the central government directly for dragging their feet on the accord.

    "All this is happening at a time when the Swat Taliban has moved into an adjoining district and are saying that they cannot be stopped from going into other areas.

    "That is going to be a very serious development and, if that peace accord does break down, it will have serious repercussions for the adjoining districts as well."

    Also on Thursday, Mullah Nezaar, a Pakistani Taliban leader, released an audio message on the internet, claiming that his group is just days away from marching on the capital.

    "Pakistan Taliban factions have united ... The day is not far when Islamabad will be in the hands of the mujahidin."

    He also accused the Pakistan army of using spies to help the US carry out unmanned drone attacks on rural areas of Pakistan.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


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