Inclusive dialogue
 
Ban said the participants agreed that "there should be more efforts by Karzai and other Afghan leaders in promoting inclusive political dialogue for national reconciliation".
 
He said there was "a strong desire" by the participants for the UN to do more, which he said it has been and will continue doing "closely monitoring the security situation there".
 
The UN has recently established nine new regional offices, bringing its total to 17 offices, he said.
 
Karzai said his government is working hard on peace talks to bring supporters of the country's former Taliban rulers, who continue to fight the US-backed government, "back to the fold".
 
Reconciliation process
 
Karzai said a peace and reconciliation process has been going on for some time alongside efforts to bring back those Taliban supporters who are not part of al-Qaeda and have been "forced or found in a position to leave Afghanistan or to pick up guns".

Karzai says 'deeds will tell' when it comes to
identifying Taliban peace partners [AFP]
He said: "It is extremely important that this process will go on."
 
Karzai said identifying who should participate in peace talks is easy.
 
"Deeds will tell, and deeds do tell."
 
He said: "We are already in contact ... with those Taliban who are not part of al-Qaeda and terrorist networks, who are really in the majority ... and we would like to add to this process as the opportunity presents itself."
 
UN position
 
Earlier, Tom Koenigs of Germany, the most senior UN envoy in Afghanistan, said the UN supports peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban and is prepared to mediate.
 
He said negotiations will not produce "a quick result" but are essential "because the insurgency cannot be won over by military means only".
 
Zalmay Khalilzad, the US ambassador to the UN and a former US envoy to Afghanistan, said whether the government can reach out to the Taliban has to be seen over time.