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Vietnam jails ex-journalist over blog post

Popular blogger sentenced to two years in prison as part of crackdown on Vietnamese criticising communist government.

Last updated: 04 Mar 2014 14:47
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Nhat was arrested after commenting on the level of scrutiny in the National Assembly's inaugural censure motion [AFP]

A court in Vietnam has sentenced a former journalist to two years in prison for speaking out against the country's communist rulers, a verdict that the United States has expressed deep concern over and called to be overturned.

On Tuesday, Truong Duy Nhat was found to have "abused his freedoms to infringe upon the state's interest" in posts on his blog, Reuters news agency reported.

His last blog post appeared in May last year, when he criticised the procedure for Vietnam first-ever parliamentary censure motion.

The sentence comes as part of a widening crackdown on Vietnamese who have criticised various government issues, despite free speech being guaranteed under the constitution and the country being awarded a seat last year on the UN Human Rights Council.

Fifty-year-old Nhat had quit his journalist job in 2010 and ran a blog titled "Truong Duy Nhat - a different viewpoint" that was known for criticism of top government officials including Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung.

Online dissent

Nhat was arrested after commenting on the level of scrutiny in the National Assembly's inaugural censure motion, which did not give lawmakers an option to cast "no confidence" votes against scores of officials that included the prime minister, president and central bank governor.

Nhat told the court he was innocent in his final remarks before sentencing in the central city of Danang, according to his lawyer Tran Vu Hai.

Most arrests and jail terms have involved bloggers or activists who posted comments on the Internet, which is used by a third of Vietnam's 90 million people and is one of only a few available channels for dissent in a country where protests are rare and the media is tightly controlled by the state.

The verdict could further complicate efforts by the United States to boost trade and military ties with Vietnam and turn a former war foe into a new ally in a region where China's sphere of influence is expanding.

It was delivered on the same day as a visit to Vietnam by US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman.

The US embassy issued a statement calling for Vietnam to free Nhat and all other political prisoners and "allow all Vietnamese to peacefully express their political views". 

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Source:
Reuters
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