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Chinese billionaire hurt in 'revenge attack'

Country's second-richest man injured in alleged revenge attack after the dismissal of employees, reports say.

Last Modified: 18 Sep 2013 10:13
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Zong Qinghou is chairman of the Wahaha Group, the country's largest beverage producer [AP]

Multi-billionaire Zong Qinghou, China's richest man until he was dethroned last week, has been injured in an alleged revenge attack following the dismissal of some employees, reports said.

Zong is chairman of China's leading beverage producer Wahaha Group and Forbes magazine estimates his personal wealth at $11bn, second only to Wang Jianlin, head of conglomerate Wanda Group, on $14bn.

The 67-year old tycoon was attacked on Friday near his home in the eastern city of Hangzhou and injured his fingers, China's official Xinhua news agency said on Wednesday citing police, adding that a suspect had been arrested.

Tendons in Zong's left hand were severed, the Shenzhen-based Hong Kong Commercial Daily reported, with a source telling the paper that the attack might have been revenge for the removal of executives at a Wahaha unit.

Representatives of the ruling Communist Party in Hangzhou have become involved in the case, the state-backed agency China News Service reported, citing an unnamed employee at Wahaha.

Neither Wahaha nor police in Hangzhou could immediately be reached for comment.

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Source:
AFP
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