[QODLink]
Asia-Pacific
Alleged Nazi war criminal wins court battle
Australian court rules that 90-year-old Charles Zentai, accused of war crimes in Hungary, cannot be extradited.
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2012 11:19
Zentai is accused of killing a Jewish teeanger in Budapest in 1944 [EPA]

An alleged Nazi war criminal living in Australia has won a long battle against the government's attempts to extradite him to Hungary to stand trial for the murder of a Jewish teenager.

Charles Zentai, now 90, was accused by Hungarian authorities of beating to death a Jewish teenager, Peter Balazs, in Budapest in 1944.

Australia's highest court ruled that Zentai could not be extradited to the country of his birth because the offence "war crime" did not exist in Hungarian law at the time the murder was alleged to have been committed.

"They way I feel at the moment? I don't know. I'm just overwhelmed," Zentai said.

Extradition request

Zentai, who migrated to Australia in 1950 and became an Australian citizen, has maintained his innocence throughout his legal challenge.

He was a 23-year-old warrant officer in the pro-Nazi Hungarian military at the time of Balazs' death, but says that he was not in Budapest when the attack took place.

A spokesperson for Jason Clare, the Australian home affairs minister, confirmed that Zentai would not be surrendered to Hungary.

A retired mental health nurse, Zentai was arrested by Australian police in 2005 after Hungary requested his extradition. Australia ordered in 2009 that Zentai be sent to Hungary, but the Federal Court overturned that ruling in 2011.

The government contested that decision, but Wednesday's court ruling threw out its appeal and leaves the government with no further challenges.

Apology sought

Zentai's family welcomed the ruling, but told Australian radio that they wanted the Australian government to apologise.

"As a soldier I just had to carry out orders ... but none of those orders I was given had anything to do with rounding up Jews or torturing them or anything like that," Zentai told Australian television in 2008.

Those seeking Zentai's prosecution, however, were critical of the ruling.

"The fact of the matter is that people who committed these crimes should not be ignored or allowed to elude justice simply because they've reached the age of 90, or even 95 or 97," Efraim Zuroff, director of the Simon Wiesenthal Centre in Jerusalem, told Al Jazeera.

"His chronological age is irrelevant. We don't think that old age should afford protection for people who committed murder. The passage of time in no way diminishes the guilt of the killers.

"Every victim of the Nazis deserves that an effort be made that the person who turned an innocent person into a victim, to be held accountable. And, quite frankly, I think it sends a very powerful message that even today, we're trying to bring these people to justice."

432

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
As nuclear age approaches eighth decade, visitors flock to historic bomb craters at New Mexico test sites.
Venezuela's president lacks the charisma and cult of personality maintained by the late Hugo Chavez.
Despite the Geneva deal, anti-government protesters in Ukraine's eastern regions don't intend to leave any time soon.
Since independence, Zimbabwe has faced food shortages, hyperinflation - and several political crises.
After a sit-in protest at Poland's parliament, lawmakers are set to raise government aid to carers of disabled youth.
join our mailing list