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Canadian accused of spying for China

A Canadian man has been arrested for allegedly passing on military secrets to Chinese government.

Last updated: 02 Dec 2013 01:02
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Police said the suspect acted alone in trying to pass information to the Chinese government [AP]

Police have arrested a Canadian man for allegedly trying to sell classified information to the Chinese government
about Canada's warship building procurement strategy.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said that Qing Quentin Huang, 53, of Burlington, Ontario, was arrested on Saturday and appeared in court on Sunday.

RCMP Chief Supt. Jennifer Strachan said the suspect is charged with communicating with a foreign entity under the Security of Information Act.

Police said the suspect works for Lloyd Register, a ship design sub-contractor to Irving Shipbuilding.

Authorities said the classified information relates to Canada's strategy on building patrol ships, frigates, naval auxiliary vessels, science research vessels and ice breakers.

Police said the suspect acted alone in trying to pass information to the Chinese government.

"In these types of cases, sharing of information may give a foreign entity a tactical, military or competitive advantage by knowing the specification of vessels responsible for defending Canadian waters and Canadian sovereignty,'' Strachan said.

Strachan called it valuable research and development information. She said it could also provide an unfair competitive and economic advantage.

Police first learned of the situation on Thursday and were able to act swiftly to safeguard the information involved, Strachan said. 

Life in prison

Stephen Lecce, a spokesman for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, praised police for their good work. RCMP Supt Larry Tremblay said Canada's foreign affairs department has been in contact with their Chinese counterparts about the case.

The suspect is due back in court on Wednesday for a bail hearing. He faces a maximum sentence of life in prison if convicted.

A Canadian navy intelligence officer was sentenced to 20 years in prison last February after pleading guilty to selling military secrets to Russia.

Jeffrey Paul Delisle worked at a naval intelligence centre and had access to information shared by Canada, the United States, Britain, Australia and New Zealand.

Delisle admitted that he walked into the Russian embassy in Ottawa in 2007 and offered his services for money.

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