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Haiti anti-government protests turn violent

Thousands of anti-government marchers take to the streets to protest against high cost of living and corruption.

Last updated: 19 Nov 2013 05:29
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Thousands of critics of Haiti's President Michel Martelly have staged protest marches that turned violent, after people threw rocks and shots were fired in the air.

The Associated Press reported that at least one person had been shot in the head during Monday's protest. It was unclear what the man's condition was, AP reported.

The marches were among the biggest demonstrations against Martelly since he took office in 2011, and the crowd in the capital swelled as protesters passed each neighbourhood. Their complaints ranged from the cost of living to high levels of government corruption.

Protesters lit fiery barricades of discarded tires on one of the busiest streets as they called for Martelly's departure from office. Demonstrators also smashed car windows and tore down posters and billboards bearing the leader's face and burned those too.

'Won't stop'

Pro-Martelly groups held separate marches, and the two sides took turns throwing rocks at each other as riot police dispensed canisters of tear gas.

"We are moving forward to removing him from power and won't stop until he leaves," said demonstrator Jean Daniel.

Martelly, his prime minister, Laurent Lamothe, and the first lady attended a church ceremony in the northern city of Cap-Haitien, the site of another, smaller protest on Monday, a national holiday that commemorates Haiti's final battle before it secured independence from France in 1804.

In a speech that followed at a historic site where the fight apparently took place, Martelly appealed for unity.

"If we didn't put our heads together, we wouldn't have had the Battle of Vertieres," he said. "If we didn't have our heads together, we wouldn't have a Haitian state."

The UN peacekeeping mission in Haiti on Saturday urged Martelly and opposition parties to sort out their differences in a peaceful manner. The world body also dispatched armed troops for the demonstration to join riot police with shields and helmets.

The mounting tension between Martelly and his opponents stems in part from the government's failure to hold legislative and local elections that are two years overdue. The UN, US and others have been supportive of the Martelly administration but relations seemed to be straining in recent months because of the delayed vote.

The election was supposed to have been held before year's end, but it most likely will not be held until next year.

"The international community should take notes," said Moise Jean-Charles, a senator and vocal critic of the government.

"The people are rising for a change. Martelly and Lamothe aren't doing anything for the country but stealing money."

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