[QODLink]
Americas

US sends two Guantanamo inmates to Algeria

Pentagon says decision to release Nabil Said Hadjarab and Mutia Sadiq Ahmad Sayyab came after comprehensive review.

Last Modified: 29 Aug 2013 13:04
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
There are 164 detainees left at the prison after the latest transfer [GALLO/GETTY]

The United States says it has transferred two men from the US detention centre at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to their homeland of Algeria.

The Pentagon on Thursday announced the transfer of Nabil Said Hadjarab and Mutia Sadiq Ahmad Sayyab, leaving 164 detainees still at the prison, including 84 others cleared for release years ago.

It was not immediately clear how long the two had been held by the US government.

The Pentagon said the decision to release them came after a comprehensive review by an interagency task force.

"As a result of that review, which examined a number of factors, including security issues, these men were approved for transfer by consensus of the six departments and agencies comprising the task force," the Pentagon said in a statement.

President Barack Obama has vowed to close the prison, which has held dozens of prisoners - most without charge - for more than a decade. But the process has dragged on for years.

Obama promised to close the facility during his 2008 presidential campaign, citing its damage to the US reputation around the world, but he has been unable to do so, in part because of resistance by Congress.

The prison camp was established during the presidency of George Bush after the September 11, 2001 attack on the US to house foreign terrorism suspects.

209

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.