[QODLink]
Americas

Peru hands Shining Path leader life sentence

Court sentences Florencio Flores Hala, one of the last leaders of the group, to life in prison on various charges.

Last Modified: 08 Jun 2013 07:14
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Hala raised his fist in defiance as the sentence was read at a prison on Callao naval base west of Lima [EPA]

A Peruvian court has sentenced one of the last historic leaders of the Shining Path Maoist group to life in prison on terrorism, drug trafficking and money laundering charges.

Florencio Flores Hala, or "Comrade Artemio," raised his fist in defiance on Friday as the sentence was read at a prison on the Callao naval base west of Lima.

The 51-year-old was also fined 500 million soles ($183 million) in damages.

His lawyers vowed to appeal the ruling and seek an annulment of the charges.

"It's a political statement. He is a political prisoner," said lawyer Alfredo Crespo.

Police and army units wounded and captured the fighter in February 2012 in the Peruvian jungle.

Artemio led attacks against security forces in the central part of the Peruvian jungle, a known hub of drug gangs where he took refuge after the 1992 capture of Abimael Guzman, the founder and historic leader of the Shining Path also held at Callao.

During the trial, Artemio denied being a terrorist and any links to the drug trade, calling himself a "revolutionary" in the "heroic people's war," a conflict that left 69,000 people dead or missing in Peru between 1980 and 2000.

The government crushed the Shining Path and a rival leftist group, the Tupac Amaru movement, during the struggle.

The Shining Path has largely been crushed by the army but remnants of the group remain, and they often attack military patrols in jungle areas.

235

Source:
AFP
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.
Featured
Lacking cohesive local ground forces to attack in tandem, coalition air strikes will have limited effect, experts say.
Hindu right-wing groups run campaign against what they say is Muslim conspiracy to convert Hindu girls into Islam.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
Muslim caretakers maintain three synagogues in eastern Indian city, which was once home to a thriving Jewish community.
Amid fresh ISIL gains, officials in Anbar province have urged the Iraqi government to request foreign ground troops.