[QODLink]
Americas

Storms in US leave thousands without power

Sheltering women killed in South Dakota and more than 200,000 homes and businesses in upper Midwest left without power.

Last Modified: 23 Jun 2013 12:26
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
A satellite image shows thunderstorm activity developing in the Gulf of Mexico [AP]

More than 200,000 homes and businesses in the US have been without power after storms with damaging winds, lightning and baseball-sized hail struck parts of the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

A 63-year-old woman sheltering in a bathtub also died after powerful winds tossed her around her trailer in South Dakota.

Storms developed in the Dakotas on Friday and drove through Minnesota into Wisconsin, producing wind gusts of up to 137kph and large hailstones, some in excess of 10cm in diameter, as well as short-lived tornadoes.

"Some 200,000 customers were still without power in Minnesota on Saturday, mainly in the Minneapolis area, and another 1,000 were without power across the border in Wisconsin," said Tom Hoen, a spokesman for Xcel Energy, which serves the area.

Hoen said there would be customers without service going into Tuesday because of the massive scale of the damage.

He added that the outages had affected 492,000 customers since the storm formed.

Other utility companies reported scattered outages in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

156

Source:
Reuters
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.