[QODLink]
Americas

Facebook defends Instagram in civil lawsuit

Social networking site says that California lawsuit against its photo sharing service is "without merit".
Last Modified: 26 Dec 2012 14:46
Changes in its privacy policy included wording which suggested it could sell user photos to advertisers [EPA]

Facebook is vowing to defend Instagram, its photo-sharing-service, which is facing a civil lawsuit for changing its terms of service and breaching its contract with users. 

The social networking website defended the popular photo application, saying the complaint was “without merit”.

A class-action lawsuit was filed in a San Francisco federal court last week, calling on the court to bar Instagram from changing its rules.

“Instagram is taking its customers property rights while insulating itself from all liability,” said the law firm which also demanded the service to pay its legal fees.

“In short, Instagram declares that 'possession is nine tenths of the law and if you don’t like it, you can’t stop us,’” the law firm added.

Changes to the Instagram privacy policy and terms of service had included wording that allowed for people's pictures to be used by advertisers at Instagram or Facebook, without any remuneration to the user.

The lawsuit comes less than a week after Kevin Systrom, Instagram CEO, released a statement which backed off from the proposed changes which were due to come into effect in January.

“I want to be really clear: Instagram has no intention of selling you photos, and we never did. We don’t own your photos, you do,” said the statement.

Tens of thousands of Instagram users in the state of California are eligible to join the class action lawsuit.

229

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
French Jews and Muslims say recent National Front victories in mayoral races reflect rising xenophobia.
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
Featured
Survivors of Bangladesh garment factory collapse say they received little compensation and face economic hardship.
As Iraq prepares to vote, deadly violence is surging. But at the site of one bomb attack, people insist life must go on.
French Jews and Muslims say recent National Front victories in mayoral races reflect rising xenophobia.
Up to 23,000 federal prisoners could qualify for clemency under new Justice Department initiative.
After years of rapid growth, Argentina is bracing for another economic crisis as inflation eats up purchasing power.
join our mailing list