[QODLink]
Americas
Nicaragua nabs fake reporters in cash scheme
Six fake Mexican TV vans and 18 individuals caught entering country from Honduras with $7m hidden inside vehicles.
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2012 08:10
Six mini-vans bearing the logo of Televisa, the Mexican state-run television conglomerate were stopped [AFP]

Nicaraguan police have seized at least $7m from 18 individuals who tried to enter the country from Honduras, claiming to be Mexican television workers, authorities have said.

Police chief Aminta Granera said on Friday that the group had tried to enter Nicaragua last Tuesday through the border crossing of Las Manos.

They were traveling in six mini-vans bearing the logo of Televisa, the Mexican state-run television conglomerate, and claimed to be working for it.

The "fake journalists" said they were traveling to Nicaragua to cover the high-profile of trial of suspects in the killing of Argentine folk singer Facundo Cabral last year.

According to Granera, the money was discovered in hiding places inside the vans during a border inspection.

Police are currently trying to determine if "the suspects have ties to organised crime", said Granera.

She said Televisa had informed Nicaraguan authorities through the Mexican Embassy that none of its television crews had been dispatched to Nicaragua at this moment.

Nicaraguan authorities say they are now working with Interpol to check whether the group has any links with criminal organisations.

Mexican drug-trafficking cartels are known to smuggle drugs and huge sums of money to and from Colombia through Central American countries.

200

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Critics claim a vaguely worded secrecy law gives the Japanese government sweeping powers.
A new book looks at Himalayan nation's decades of political change and difficult transition from monarchy to democracy.
The Church of Christ built a $200m megachurch while analysts say members vote in a block.
US state is first to issue comprehensive draft regulations for the online currency, but critics say they are onerous.
Survivors of Shujayea bombardment recount horror tales amid frantic search for lost family members.
join our mailing list