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Facebook founder updates status to 'married'
Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan tie the knot at a small ceremony in Palo Alto, California, capping a busy week.
Last Modified: 20 May 2012 02:33
Zuckerberg published a wedding picture on his Facebook profile

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg has updated his status to "married".

Zuckerberg and 27-year-old Priscilla Chan tied the knot on Saturday at a small ceremony in Palo Alto, California.

It caps a busy week for the couple. Zuckerberg took his company public in one of the most anticipated stock offerings in Wall Street history on Friday. And Chan graduated from medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, on Monday, the same day Zuckerberg turned 28.

The couple met at Harvard and have been together for more than nine years.

A company spokeswoman said Zuckerberg designed the ring featuring "a very simple ruby" himself.

The ceremony took place in Zuckerberg's backyard before fewer than 100 guests, who all thought they were there to celebrate Chan's graduation.

Even after the stock market launch, Zuckerberg remains Facebook's single largest shareholder, with 503.6 million shares. He also controls the company with 56 per cent of its voting stock.

Zuckerberg founded Facebook at Harvard in 2004. The site was born in a dorm room and has grown into a worldwide network of almost a billion people. He was named as Time's Person of the Year in 2010, at age 26.

Source:
Agencies
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