CAR armed factions sign ceasefire pact

Representatives of Muslim-majority Seleka sign agreement with Christian groups that aims to end months of violence.

    CAR armed factions sign ceasefire pact
    Thousands of Muslims have been displaced after attacks by Christian militias [Al Jazeera]

    Representatives of the majority-Muslim Seleka have signed a ceasefire agreement with Christian factions to end fighting in the Central African Republic.

    The signing of the pact on Wednesday in Brazzaville, the capital of neighboring Republic of Congo, came after heavy pressure from regional mediators, aims to put an end to months of sectarian violence.

    It is not clear if the ceasefire will be respected by the fighters in Central African Republic.

    Representing the Seleka faction was Mohamed Moussa Dhaffane.

    CAR has been gripped by ethnic and religious violence since northern Seleka rebels seized power in the predominantly Christian nation in 2013.

    The Seleka left power in January under international pressure and since then anti-balaka Christian militias have targeted Muslims.

    Those attacks have largely driven Muslims from the capital Bangui and the west, effectively partitioning the country, whose east is controlled mainly by Seleka.

    A civilian transitional government is now tasked with organizing national elections by February.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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