[QODLink]
Africa

Armed men surround Libya's justice ministry

Gunmen demand former aides to deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi be barred from senior government posts.

Last Modified: 30 Apr 2013 12:13
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

Armed men in pick-up trucks have surrounded Libya's justice ministry to step up demands for former aides to deposed leader Muammar Gaddafi to be barred from senior government posts, an official says.

"Several armed men in vehicles equipped with anti-aircraft guns surrounded the ministry of justice," Walid Ben Rabha, head of the ministry's information department, said on Tuesday.

"They asked the minister and staff present to leave their offices and close the ministry."

Tensions between the government and armed groups have been rising in recent weeks since a campaign was launched to dislodge the armed groups from their strongholds in the capital Tripoli.

Armed men first ringed the foreign ministry on Sunday and have targeted other state buildings to push for a law to be passed to ban former aides to Gaddafi, who was overthrown and killed in a 2011 uprising, from government service.

The unrest prompted the General National Congress to postpone its next sitting, scheduled for Tuesday, to Sunday.

A spokesman said this would give them time to study the legislation the protesters are calling for.

If passed, the law could force out several long-serving ministers as well as the congress leader, depending on the wording adopted.

The build-up in armed protests this week have increased  security fears in Tripoli and prompted the German embassy to
suspend some activities.

Protesters have also unsuccessfully tried to storm the interior ministry.

218

Source:
Agencies
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Western fighters have streamed into the Middle East to help 'liberate' Arab countries such as Syria and Libya.
The Pakistani government is proposing reform of the nation's madrassas, which are accused of fostering terrorism.
Weaving and handicrafts are being re-taught to a younger generation of Iraqi Kurds, but not without challenges.
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Featured
Up to 23,000 federal prisoners could qualify for clemency under new Justice Department initiative.
After years of rapid growth, Argentina is bracing for another economic crisis as inflation eats up purchasing power.
Deaths of 13 Sherpas in Nepal has shone a light on dangerous working conditions in the Everest-climbing industry.
Al Jazeera investigation uncovers allegations of beatings and rape in Kenya's ongoing anti-terrorism operation.
Incumbent Joyce Banda has a narrow lead, but anything is possible in Malawi's May 20 elections.
join our mailing list