[QODLink]
Africa

Malawi to take Tanzania dispute to court

Malawi President Joyce Banda says her country is giving up on mediation efforts in the long running border dispute.

Last Modified: 02 Apr 2013 05:36
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Banda, left, announced decision to go the court after returning from visits to the US and Britain [EPA]

President Joyce Banda has said that Malawi was giving up on mediation efforts and would take to the courts to
settle a long dormant border dispute with Tanzania which has been re-activated by prospects of an oil find.

"Our view is that we should eventually go to court. We should not waste time on this (mediation)," Banda told reporters in Lilongwe on Monday after returning from visits to the US and Britain.

She said the mediation bid left to Mozambique's ex-president Joachim Chissano in his capacity as head of a forum of retired leaders from the regional bloc SADC, was "compromised because information submitted by Malawi was leaked to Tanzania".

She accused the executive secretary of the forum, John Tesha, a Tanzanian national, for leaking some vital information to his home country.

"After surrendering our documents, we were told that they were leaked to Tanzania before the Tanzanians surrendered theirs," Banda said.

"We feel everything is compromised," she said. In December Banda said the dispute had dragged for too long and she was considering taking it to the International Court of Justice for arbitration.

At stake is a largely undeveloped swathe of the lake where Malawi has awarded a licence to British firm Surestream to explore for oil in the north-eastern waters near Tanzania.

Malawi claims ownership of the entire lake under an 1890 agreement, while Tanzania disputes this validity, insisting part of the lake falls within its borders. Talks in the past ended in a deadlock.

247

Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.
Featured
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Since she was 16-years-old, Scottish Nationalist Party's Sturgeon has strove for independence from the UK.
Armed group's ransom success with German hostages marks a re-emergence, as authorities investigate ISIL links.
Western nations are moving into the resource-rich country after decades of disinterest, challenging China's interests.