[QODLink]
Africa

Referendum polls close in Zimbabwe

Low turnout at polls in referendum on new constitution that would limit powers of President Robert Mugabe.
Last Modified: 16 Mar 2013 22:28

Zimbabweans have finished voting in a referendum that is expected to endorse a new constitution that would reduce President Robert Mugabe's powers and clear the decks for elections later in the year.

Turnout at the poll was generally low across the country on Saturday but both Mugabe and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai have been optimistic the constitution would be approved before presidential and parliamentary elections later in the year.

"We want peace in the country. Peace, peace, peace. It must begin with Robert Mugabe and go on to you and everyone else," said Mugabe as he voted in the Highfield township near downtown Harare, accompanied by his wife and daughter. 

The country's main political parties, including Mugabe's ZANU-PF, are in favour of the proposed law changes, making the simple majority needed for a "yes" vote a near certainty.

Official results are expected to be released within five days of the vote.

Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa, reporting from the capital Harare, said "many people are hoping for a change, mainly an economic one ... People want jobs, because right now people are struggling".

An attack on activists and officials of Tsvangirai's party on the eve of the vote marred what had been a relatively peaceful campaign.

Although authorities have targeted pro-democracy groups in the runup to the vote, arresting their leaders and seizing equipment, few deaths have been reported.

During the attack on Friday, members of Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) were punched as they put up posters urging voters to approve the proposed law.

'Violent country' 

The MDC suggested the attack was perpetrated by supporters of Mugabe's ZANU-PF.

Police dismissed the incident as stage-managed by a BBC television crew, who were also attacked, to "portray Zimbabwe as a violent country".

Inside Story: Zimbabwe constitution referendum 

The new constitution would curb the presidential powers that Mugabe has enjoyed during his 33-year rule and lay the groundwork for elections due in July that would end an often acrimonious power-sharing deal between Mugabe and
Tsvangirai.

"This constitution is fairly straightforward, the election is what is uncertain ... The problem with Zimbabwe has always been that too much power has been in the hands of the president," our correspondent said.

Although the draft has the backing of both 89-year-old Mugabe and his rival Tsvangirai, 61, tensions between supporters of the two main parties are seething after a series of bloody elections in the crisis-weary country.

"The attacks are a clear testimony that ZANU-PF wants to embark on acts of violence," Douglas Mwonzora, MDC spokesman, said.

During 2008 elections more than 180 people were killed and 9,000 injured, according to Amnesty International, the UK-based rights monitor, prompting a national crisis that forced Mugabe into his power-sharing deal with Tsvangirai.

Many saw the government's harassment of activists in the runup to the referendum as a prelude to a more serious election crackdown.

525

Source:
Al Jazeera And Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
As Syria's civil war escalates along the Turkish border, many in Turkey are questioning the country's involvement.
Treatment for autism in the region has progressed, but lack of awareness and support services remains a challenge.
join our mailing list