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UK's Cameron in Algeria for security talks

Prime minister will be first western leader to visit country since the recent deadly assault on its gas installations.
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2013 23:55
President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, right, called the visit a chance 'to renew political dialogue' with Britain [AFP]

British Prime Minister David Cameron has arrived in Algeria for security talks, just two weeks after a hostage crisis at a gas plant in the Sahara.

Cameron was received on Wednesday by Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal and later also had talks with President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, the national APS news agency reported.

This was the first visit by a British prime minister since Algeria won independence from France in 1962.

'Tackling extremism'

Six British citizens are believed to have been among the 37 foreign hostages killed at the In Amenas facility. One Algerian and 29 gunmen were also killed.

"What I want to do is work with the Algerian government and with other governments in the region to make sure that we do everything that we can to combat terrorism..."

- David Cameron, British PM

Cameron would seek a partnership with Algeria on "tackling extremism", reflecting growing concern in London about unrest in North Africa, the British leader's spokesperson said.

Cameron told reporters travelling with him that the gas complex attack and a French-led military operation in Mali "reminds us of the importance of partnership between Britain and countries in the region".

"What I want to do is work with the Algerian government and with other governments in the region to make sure that we do everything that we can to combat terrorism in a way that is both tough and intelligent, and uses everything we have at our disposal, which will make them safer, make us safer, make the world safer," Cameron said from Algiers.

"What is required in countries like Mali, just as in countries like Somalia on the other side of Africa, is that combination of a tough approach on security, aid, politics, settling grievances and problems," he said.

"An intelligent approach that brings together all the things we need to do with countries in this neighbourhood to help them to make them safer but to make us safer too."

'Renew political dialogue'

Cameron is accompanied by his national security adviser and a trade envoy, Downing Street said, while British reports said the head of Britain's foreign intelligence service MI6 was also on the trip.

"The talks are expected to focus on strengthening our security co-operation and seeing how we can work in partnership with the Algerians to deliver a tough, patient and intelligent response to tackle the terrorist threat," his spokesperson said.

A statement from the Algerian presidency called the visit a chance "to renew political dialogue" with Britain.

Six UK citizens are believed to have been among 37 foreign hostages killed at In Amenas facility [Reuters]

It would enable "an exchange of views and analysis between President Bouteflika and his guest on a number of questions of common interest and on topics relating to current regional and international events," it added.

Britain expressed concern after the hostage crisis erupted that London had not been consulted before the Algerian authorities launched their military operation, but Cameron's spokesperson played this down.

"We were clear at the time we were disappointed not to be told about the initial rescue but the prime minister is looking forward to this trip to see how we can strengthen ties with Algeria," she said.

The visit was "part of efforts to lead a coordinated international response to the evolving threat from al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, which is operating from parts of the Sahel region," she said.

"We want to stand side-by-side with countries in the region working together to overcome the threat."

After his arrival, Cameron placed flowers at the monument to martyrs of the Algerian war of independence at El Madania, overlooking the capital.

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