[QODLink]
Africa

Ghanaians vote for new president

Tight race expected as one of Africa's most stable democracies elects its next leader and parliament.
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2012 07:24

Ghanaians are choosing who will run one of Africa's most stable democracies as a surge in oil revenues promises to boost development and economic growth.

Ghana has had five elections since military rule ended in 1992, but the stakes are seen as higher than ever in Friday’s vote, as commercial oil production that began in 2010 is set to expand.

President John Dramani Mahama, 54, of the National Democratic Congress (NDC), only took power in July, when his predecessor John Atta Mills died following an illness.

The names of six minor candidates also appear on the presidential ballot and could help force a runoff second-round vote.

'Mutual loathing'

His challenger, 68-year-old Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party (NPP), lost by less than one percentage point in 2008, and insists he is poised to reverse that narrow defeat.

Voters will also be electing a new 275-seat parliament in Friday's vote.

The NDC won a narrow edge in seats over the NPP in the 2008 vote.

Analysts say that as Ghana's democracy has deepened, the rivalry between the ruling NDC and challenger NPP has also intensified.

"Mutual loathing may be a good way to describe how the parties view each other," said Emmanuel Gyimah-Boadi, a political science professor at the University of Ghana.

"Both parties have tasted power. They know what comes with power. If you capture the presidency, you control all the machinery of the state and unlike the past, we now have oil. The state coffers will be brimming."

One of the world's newest oil producers, Ghana is also a top exporter of cocoa and gold, with economic growth of 14 per cent in 2011. Eight per cent growth is expected for 2012 and 2013, according to the World Bank.

292

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.