[QODLink]
Africa

Embassy violence suspect dies in Tunisia

Man detained in connection with unrest outside the US embassy in Tunis dies after a 57-day hunger strike.
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2012 21:51
About one hundred people demonstrated in front of the US embassy for in Tunis in September [EPA]

Bechir Gholli, a Tunisian detained in connection with an attack on the US embassy in Tunis in September, has died after going without food for nearly two months ago, his lawyer says.

Another detained suspect on hunger strike, Mohamed Bakhti, 28, was in a "critical condition", the lawyer said on Thursday.

"Bechir Gholli, on hunger strike for 57 days, was transferred to hospital on November 13 and died today from a heart attack," Abdelbasset Ben Mbarek told AFP by telephone on Thursday.

Gholli, 23, the father of a six-month-old baby, was accused of participating in deadly disturbances outside the US embassy in September, which the authorities said were orchestrated by Salafist hardliners.

"He was innocent, he went on hunger strike to defend himself," Ben Mbarek said, adding that his client was not a Salafist.

The justice ministry declined to comment but a judicial source confirmed that two hunger-strikers had been taken to hospital in critical condition on Thursday.

Several hundred protesters, angry over an anti-Islam film made in the US, stormed the sprawling US embassy compound in a suburb of the capital on September 14, in violence that left four people dead and dozens wounded.

More than 100 people were detained following the attack. Tunisia's hardline Islamists have carried out numerous acts of violence since last year's revolution that ousted veteran strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

232

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
Survivors of Shujayea bombardment recount horror tales amid frantic search for lost family members.
Abdiweli Sheikh Ahmed tells international donors to be more accountable and work more closely with the government.
Indian rights activists are concerned about proposed changes in juvenile law that will allow harsher punishment.
Acidification of the world's oceans is believed to be behind plummet in oyster population in the US' Pacific Northwest.
Survivors of US riot have been seeking reparations for the destruction of their homes and businesses with no results.
join our mailing list