Libya's first post-Gaddafi vote 'delayed'

Official tells Al Jazeera that country's assembly elections, scheduled for this month, will not take place before July.

    Libya's first post-Gaddafi vote 'delayed'
    Over 2.7 million Libyans have registered nationwide to vote in upcoming assembly elections [Al Jazeera]

    A Libyan official has told Al Jazeera that the country's assembly elections will be delayed until the first week of July at the earliest.

    The first elections since the fall of the country's longtime leader Muammar Gaddafi were due to be held on June 19.

    Two hundred representatives are to be elected and tasked with drafting the country's constitution, but authorities say they need more time to vet candidates.

    The ratification process for the roughly 4,000 potential candidates was scheduled to be completed by June 6.

    Libya's former deputy election commissioner quit his post in May because he said he did not believe that the country would be ready for next month's elections.

    Sghair Majeri told Al Jazeera at the time that "holding elections by June 19 is a mission impossible" as vetting the candidates and printing and distributing the ballots across the country would take weeks.

    "That would need at least four weeks, which means voting cannot take place before the second week of July," said Majeri in May.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Assad to Putin: Thank you for 'saving our country'

    Assad to Putin: Thank you for 'saving our country'

    Russian and Syrian presidents meet to discuss strategy against 'terrorism' and political settlement options.

    What is behind the covert Israeli-Saudi relations?

    What is behind the covert Israeli-Saudi relations?

    Analysts say that the recent covert ties between Israel and Saudi Arabia are due to a new regional paradigm.

    Is Saudi Arabia becoming a danger to the region?

    Is Saudi Arabia becoming a danger to the region?

    We talk to US Congressman Ro Khanna about power politics and debate Mohammed bin Salman's new strategy for the Kingdom.