[QODLink]
Africa
Suicide blast hits base near Somali capital
Al-Shabab bomber rams explosives-laden car into government base west of Mogadishu, causing a number of casualties.
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2012 14:12

An al-Shabab suicide bomber has rammed a vehicle packed with explosives into the gate of a Somali government base in Afgoye, west of Mogadishu, the capital, causing casualties.

Al-Shabab said its suicide bomber had "killed dozens" in Saturday's attack, while the police said the blast had only wounded three soldiers.

The figures could not be independently verified. Many parties in the Somalia conflict tend to exaggerate enemy losses
and minimise their own.

Government and African Union (AU) troops seized Afgoye from al-Shabab at the end of May.

The town is about 30km from Mogadishu on a key road that links the capital with al-Shabab-held regions in the south of country.

"The suicide car bomb tried to follow our vehicles entering the base. But it could not. It exploded at the gate. So far only three of our soldiers are injured," Colonel Nur Hayr, a police officer, told the Reuters news agency.

Sheikh Abdiasis Abu Musab, the spokesman for al Shabab's military operations, said: "Our fighter managed to enter with his car bomb inside government forces base in Afgoye. We killed dozens.

"The car was heavily laden with explosives. It is a great victory for al-Shabab."

Since al-Shabab, an armed Islamist group, withdrew from the capital last August, it has increasingly turned to suicide bombers and grenade attacks to target government and AU positions.

221

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.