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Africa
Gabon court upholds Bongo poll win
Son of country's longtime leader confirmed as president after disputed August vote.
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2009 13:16 GMT
The disputed vote sparked days of violent protests in at least two cities [FILE AFP]

Gabon's constitutional court has confirmed Ali Bongo as the winner of the country's disputed August presidential election, rejecting challenges to the vote from several opposition candidates.

Marie Madeleine Mborantsuo, the president of the court, said late on Monday that Bongo had received nearly 41.8 per cent of the votes in the August 30 election.

Bongo is expected to be sworn in before the end of the week.

The country's interior ministry had declared Bongo the winner of the election in September, but opposition leaders dismissed the vote as fraudulent.

Vote 'manipulation'

Second- and third-place candidates Pierre Mamboundou, a veteran opposition leader, and Andre Mba Obame, a former interior minister, were among those who filed complaints against the outcome of the vote.

The two had accused Bongo of "serious manipulation" and called for a recount, The Associated Press news agency reported.

Bongo's rivals had also said they feared the official results were being massaged to ensure a dynastic succession from father to son.

Bongo, a former defence minister, has denied the accusation.

The disputed vote sparked days of protests in Libreville, the capital, and Port Gentil, Gabon's second city.

Bongo is the eldest son of former leader Omar Bongo, who ruled the country for more than 41 years until his death in June.

Source:
Agencies
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