Authorities ask Facebook to help fight blasphemy

Pakistanis turn to social media network for help in investigating "blasphemous content" on the platform.

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    Authorities ask Facebook to help fight blasphemy
    There are 40 people on death row or serving life sentences for committing blasphemy in Pakistan [EPA]

    Islamabad, Pakistan - Pakistani authorities have contacted social media website Facebook for help in investigating the posting of "blasphemous content" on the platform by Pakistanis, according to a statement.

    Blasphemy is an extremely sensitive issue in Pakistan. Insulting the Prophet Muhammad carries a judicial death sentence and, increasingly commonly, the threat of extrajudicial murder by right-wing vigilantes.

    At least 68 people have been killed in connection with blasphemy allegations since 1990, according to a tally maintained by Al Jazeera.

    "There have been positive developments in the matter of the Pakistani government's contact with Facebook's management regarding the blocking of blasphemous content," an interior ministry spokesperson said in a statement on Thursday.

    READ MORE: In Pakistan, a shrine to murder for 'blasphemy'

    Facebook would be sending a representative to visit Pakistan with regard to the matter, the statement said, and the government has appointed an official to liaise directly with the social networking website regarding the censoring of certain content.

    In a statement quoted by the AP news agency, Facebook said it viewed government requests with care keeping in mind "the goal of protecting the privacy and rights of our users".

    The move comes after Nawaz Sharif, Pakistan's prime minister, ordered a ban on all online content deemed to be "blasphemous" on Tuesday.

    "Ridiculing a religion in the name of freedom of expression should not be allowed," Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan, Pakistan's interior minister, said on Thursday.

    Khan is spearheading the government's efforts to have the material blocked.

    READ MORE: TV host Aamir Liaquat banned over 'hate speech'

    Eleven people have been identified as having posted "blasphemous" comments or material on Facebook and will be acted against, the minister said. The identities of the 11 people in question were not immediately clear.

    The authorities' move comes after a senior judge at the Islamabad High Court called upon the government to block all blasphemous content online, "even at the cost of blocking entire social media".

    The petition at the High Court accuses five rights activists who were abducted in early January of running Facebook pages that had posted content deemed to be blasphemous.

    No evidence has been shared directly linking the five activists to the Facebook pages in question, but during their three-week disappearance the men were the subject of a vast social media campaign accusing them of blasphemy.

    READ MORE: Pakistan's violent cyberspace - No place for dissent

    Pakistan's telecommunications regulator currently blocks hundreds of websites, including those run by ethnic Baloch dissidents, as well as sites containing pornography or material deemed to be blasphemous.

    It is empowered under a 2016 law to block any content "if it considers it necessary in the interest of the glory of Islam or the integrity, security or defence of Pakistan or any part thereof, public order, decency or morality".

    In January 2016, Pakistan ended a three-year ban on video-sharing website YouTube, also over blasphemous content, after the content provider agreed to launch a localised version that would streamline the process for content to be censored for viewers in Pakistan.

    Asad Hashim is Al Jazeeras Web Correspondent in Pakistan. He tweets @AsadHashim.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera News


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