Strike kills al-Nusra Front fighters in Syria: monitor

At least 16 senior members of the group killed in an air strike on an airbase it controls in northwest of the country.

    Strike kills al-Nusra Front fighters in Syria: monitor
    Idlib province is almost completely controlled by rebel groups [Andrew Kravchenko/AP/File]

    At least 16 senior members of the al-Nusra Front armed group have been killed in an air strike in Syria, according to an organisation that monitors the war there.

    The strike hit a meeting the group was holding at the Abu al-Duhur airbase in the northwest of the country on Thursday, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

    One of the dead was a foreign commander, the monitor said.

    It was not immediately clear who carried out the strike. Both Russia and the United States have previously targeted the al-Nusra Front in Syria.

    Idlib province, where the attack took place, borders Turkey and is almost completely controlled by rebel groups, including the al-Nusra Front and Ahrar al-Sham.

    Al-Nusra Front is part of an alliance of groups known as Jaish al-Fatah, which is fighting the forces of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his Russian- and Iranian-backed allies in the Aleppo countryside.

    At least 250,000 people have been killed during Syria's five-year war, according to the United Nations, and four million people have been forced to flee the country.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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