South African women lead fight against rhino poaching

Rangers cut poaching in a national park by 75 percent at a time when the black market for horns is booming.

    An average of three rhinos were poached in South Africa every day in 2014.

    Now, a women-only team of rangers has cut poaching in a national park by 75 percent, which is seen as a major success at a time when the black market for horns is booming.

    Before taking on poachers, the "Black Mambas", as the rangers are called, were unemployed. They say helping save rhinos has given them independence and confidence.

    Al Jazeera's Erica Wood reports from the western border of the Greater Kruger National Park.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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