"Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me."

This verse from the poem by Emma Lazarus titled " The New Colossus " was not quite the words used by Naguib Sawiris, but it seems to be what he meant. The Egyptian billionaire caused a tempest when he announced his wish to buy a Mediterranean island - possibly near Rhodes, where the original Colossus stood - to provide shelter for the region's desperate refugees.

"Greece or Italy sell me an island, I'll [declare] its independence and host the migrants and provide jobs for them building their new country," Sawiris tweeted . And this brave, new refugee republic would be named Ilan, the Egyptian tycoon later elaborated , in honour of Aylan Kurdi, the drowned Syrian child   whose haunting image shook the holder.

Photos of drowned Syrian boy spark outcry

With neighbouring countries unable to cope further with the influx of Syrian refugees and wealthy regional states doing almost nothing to take them in - while even contributing by proxy to the Syrian refugee crisis and directly in Yemen - Sawiris is the latest entrepreneur to step into the void. One prominent example was Turkey's yoghurt mogul, Hamdi Ulukaya, who pledged to give away more than half of his $1.4bn fortune to help Kurdish and other refugees.

Symbolic notion

Sawiris's proposal resonated so widely because it is an appealing and symbolic notion which tugs at the heartstrings. As untold thousands of refugees take to the sea to escape the shipwreck of failed and failing nation states, Ilan island will provide them with a safe haven from the storm, and a place where they can live in dignity, and not be "treated and used like cattle", in Sawiris' words.


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The scheme, though extremely costly for the Egyptian billionaire, sounds impressively self-sufficient. Housing, educational and other infrastructure on the uninhabited island would be built, and presumably operated, by the refugees themselves, providing them with a shot at independence and dignity, rather than the marginalisation and unemployment that often greets those fleeing conflict.

Sawiris' implied faith in the refugees' abilities, work ethic and potential for productivity is an implicit jab at Europe's anti-immigrant right, who regard refugees and migrants as lazy layabouts...

 

Sawiris' implied faith in the refugees' abilities, work ethic and potential for productivity is an implicit jab at Europe's anti-immigrant right, who regard refugees and migrants as lazy layabouts and a threat to their way of life. It would also help boost Europe's capacity to absorb refugees by providing it with a purpose-built refuge.

That said, despite the presence of numerous candidate islands and the welcome income to the cash-strapped treasuries of Greece or Italy, it seems unlikely that either country will take enthusiastically to the scheme.

One major stumbling block is the question of sovereignty. Which European country would be willing to cede territory, which would be declared "independent", to the eccentric scheme of a foreign billionaire?

Idealistic project

Even if they were to accept this or were to retain sovereignty, there would be the possible fear that, rather than serve as an alternative for refugees who would steer clear of the European mainland, the island would simply become a stepping stone to Europe, rather like the Italian island of Lampedusa or the Greek island of Kos. This would especially be the case if Sawiris' idealistic project ends up becoming little more than a glorified refugee camp, rather than a utopian republic.

But it is Sawiris' almost Platonic discourse of a just republic for refugees that is probably the most appealing to the Arab public's ear, especially if, against the odds and expectations, this idealised and idyllic oasis can succeed where Arab regimes have failed.

In fact, it would be extremely poignant - even poetic - if refugees fleeing murderous dictatorships and blood-thirsty non-state groups managed to construct a functioning and productive society which respects individual freedom and dignity. If successful, I imagine it would attract Arab immigrants, not just refugees.

Egyptian billionaire Naguib Sawiris [Getty]

In addition to the challenge of building an effective society from scratch by traumatised people from diverse backgrounds, one wonders whether Sawiris will have the commitment to carry through with such a feat.

It is true that Sawiris was a self-declared supporter (and fairly enthusiastic for a businessman who made the bulk of his fortune under Mubarak) of the 2011 revolution, helping set up the "Council of Wisemen" which was rejected by Egypt's revolutionary youth .

Can the rich help?

However, like with many Egyptians, the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood and Mohamed Morsi spooked him, and the party he established, the Free Egyptians Party, backed Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi's campaign for president , despite the clearly undemocratic way Sisi got to where he was and his violent repression of dissent.


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This raises the question of whether rich Egyptians and Arabs can help lead their societies down the path to freedom, justice, equality and prosperity.

Some Arab tycoons are joining the growing movement of billionaires committed to philanthropy. For example, Saudi Arabia's Prince Alwaleed bin Talal has voiced his intentions to give away his considerable fortune.

Despite the undoubted value of philanthropy and the importance of interclass solidarity, the world's billionaires are more a part of the problem than the solution, especially when you consider that the richest 1 percent own more than the rest of the world, and 85 or so billionaires are worth as much as half of humanity.

This is the case in the Arab world, and perhaps more so. Not only is economic inequality massive, and widening, the region has become a living laboratory for unfettered neoliberal economics and a stronghold for crony capitalism.

The intimate links, both explicit and implicit, between the business elites, the military, and repressive regimes across the region mean that, no matter how well-meaning, the individual efforts of (relatively) enlightened tycoons are no substitute for systematic and fundamental change and reform.

More than greater philanthropy, the Arab world is crying out for greater social democracy, equity, solidarity, welfare systems, education and justice for all.

Khaled Diab is an award-winning Egyptian-Belgian journalist, writer and blogger. He is the author of Intimate Enemies: Living with Israelis and Palestinians in the Holy Land. He blogs at www.chronikler.com.

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial policy. 

Source: Al Jazeera