[QODLink]
Interactive
Uganda Speaks responds to Kony2012
Watch our latest report from northern Uganda and add your voice to the discussion around this controversial campaign.
Last Modified: 21 Apr 2012 10:19

Invisible Children's Kony2012 video has brought infamy to Central Africa's rebel group, the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and its leader, Joseph Kony.

But many have criticised the campaign for ignoring voices from people on the ground.

A group of Ugandan bloggers and filmmakers, collectively known as Uganda Speaks, have now released their own film online looking at the LRA and its impact from their perspective, in a move they say aims to bring local voices into the debate.

Click on the video below to watch a report on the subject by Al Jazeera's Malcolm Webb, who met Uganda Speaks in northern Uganda. Some of the reactions from our social-media communities will appear in the right-hand column as you play the video.

Please update to the latest version of your web browser if the interactive player does not work. 

 

   
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Youtube video A Life without Kony, on the left, was released on April 20 by the Uganda Speaks group. They say they spoke to the people of northern Uganda to "recapture the narrative of Kony2012, following Invisible Children's release of the controversial viral Kony2012".

The YouTube video on the right was released by Invisible Children in response to the criticism it received from many in Uganda for their Kony2012 video which went viral.

Watch our report and the two Youtube videos, and share your thoughts with us in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.