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In Pictures
Fleeing Syria for their lives
Al Jazeera showcases the most important object that the refugees fled with, on a day their numbers touched one million.
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2013 23:41

The names of the refugees shown below have been changed to protect their identities.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Yusuf and his family fled their home several months before this photograph was taken. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria is the mobile phone that he holds in this photograph. "With this, I'm able to call my father. We're close enough to Syria here that I can catch signal from the Syrian towers sometimes." The phone also holds photographs of family members who are still in Syria, which he is able to keep with him at all times.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Abdul and his family fled from their apartment in Syria after his wife was shot in the street during cross-fire between armed groups. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria are the keys to his home that he holds in this photograph. Though he doesn't know whether the family's apartment is still standing, he dreams every day of returning home.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Tamara's home in Syria was partially destroyed in September, and the family decided their best chance of safety was to reach the Syrian-Turkish border. "When we left our house, we felt the sky was raining bullets," Tamara recalled. "We were moving from one shelter to another in order to protect ourselves." The most important thing that she was able to bring with her is her diploma. With it she will be able to continue her education in Turkey.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Ahmed, 82, and his wife Fatima, 67, fled from their home in August 2012 after their  neighbour was killed for asking soldiers why they had executed his son. The most important thing Ahmed was able to bring with him from Syria is his wife. "She's the best woman that I've met in my life," he says. "Even if I were to go back 55 years, I would choose you again."


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Iman, 25, decided to flee with her son and daughter when she heard accounts of sexual harassment against women in her home city in Syria. The most important thing Iman was able to bring with her is the Koran that she holds here. She says religion is the most important aspect of her life, and that the Koran gives her a sense of protection. "As long as I have it with me, I'm connected to God," she says.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Marwa, 8, and her family arrived in a refugee camp in Iraq by foot. She says she wept as she made the journey through the cold, over a rough trail, as her mother carried her and her baby brother.  She is now attending school and says that she finally feels safe. The most important thing she was able to bring with her when she left are the bracelets she displays in this photograph.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Amina, 9, lives with her family in an uninsulated, partially constructed home in Iraq. About 30 people share the cold, drafty space. The most important thing Amina was able to bring with her are the jeans that she holds in this photograph. She has only worn the jeans three times, all in Syria - twice to wedding parties, and once when she went to visit her grandfather.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Salma, 24, and her family were forced to flee their home last summer. Confined to a wheelchair and blind in both eyes, she says she was terrified by what was happening around her. Salma says the only important thing that she brought with her "is my soul, nothing more - nothing material". When asked about her wheelchair, she seemed surprised, saying that she considers it an extension of her body, not an object.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Abdulaziz, 37, fled his home in Syria the night his neighbors were killed. The next day he used the majority of his savings to hire a truck to flee with his wife and his two sons. The most important thing that he was able to bring with him is the instrument he holds here. It is called a buzuq and he says that "playing it fills me with a sense of nostalgia and reminds me of my homeland".


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Hisham, 37, and his family fled Syria early in 2012, paying a smuggler $1,100 to take them across the border. The most important thing Hisham was able to bring with him is the photograph of his wife that he holds here. "This is important," he says, "because she gave me this photo back home before we were married, during the time when we were dating. It always brings me great memories and reminds me of my happiest time back home in Syria."


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Neda, approximately 100 years old (age between 90 and 107 according to family members), fled from her home last December when the apartments surrounding hers were destroyed. Crossing the border into Iraq was a very difficult process for her, and the journey on foot lasted the better part of a day. The most important thing she was able to bring with her is the ring that she displays here. When she was ten years old, her mother gave it to her from her death bed, saying, "Keep this ring and remember me."


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Mohammed, 70, and his family fled Syria when their family home in Damascus was destroyed by a bomb. They escaped in the back of a truck after covering themselves with plastic sheeting. The most important thing Mohammed was able to bring with him is the cane that he holds in this photograph. He says that without it, he wouldn't have been able to make the two-hour crossing on foot to the Iraqi border.


Brian Sokol/UNHCR
Abdullah, 43, the imam of the only mosque in the refugee camp he lives in in Iraq, fled with his family after being warned that armed groups were searching for him. The most important thing Abdullah was able to bring with him is the Koran that he holds in this photograph. As an imam, he says religion is the most important aspect of his life.




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captions:
Yusuf and his family fled their home several months before this photograph was taken. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria is the mobile phone that he holds in this photograph. "With this, I\(***)m able to call my father. We\(***)re close enough to Syria here that I can catch signal from the Syrian towers sometimes." The phone also holds photographs of family members who are still in Syria, which he is able to keep with him at all times.;*;Abdul and his family fled from their apartment in Syria after his wife was shot in the street during cross-fire between armed groups. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria are the keys to his home that he holds in this photograph. Though he doesn\(***)t know whether the family\(***)s apartment is still standing, he dreams every day of returning home.;*;Tamara\(***)s home in Syria was partially destroyed in September, and the family decided their best chance of safety was to reach the Syrian-Turkish border. "When we left our house, we felt the sky was raining bullets," Tamara recalled. "We were moving from one shelter to another in order to protect ourselves." The most important thing that she was able to bring with her is her diploma. With it she will be able to continue her education in Turkey.;*;Ahmed, 82, and his wife Fatima, 67, fled from their home in August 2012 after their  neighbour was killed for asking soldiers why they had executed his son. The most important thing Ahmed was able to bring with him from Syria is his wife. "She\(***)s the best woman that I\(***)ve met in my life," he says. "Even if I were to go back 55 years, I would choose you again.";*;Iman, 25, decided to flee with her son and daughter when she heard accounts of sexual harassment against women in her home city in Syria. The most important thing Iman was able to bring with her is the Koran that she holds here. She says religion is the most important aspect of her life, and that the Koran gives her a sense of protection. "As long as I have it with me, I\(***)m connected to God," she says.;*;Marwa, 8, and her family arrived in a refugee camp in Iraq by foot. She says she wept as she made the journey through the cold, over a rough trail, as her mother carried her and her baby brother.  She is now attending school and says that she finally feels safe. The most important thing she was able to bring with her when she left are the bracelets she displays in this photograph.;*;Amina, 9, lives with her family in an uninsulated, partially constructed home in Iraq. About 30 people share the cold, drafty space. The most important thing Amina was able to bring with her are the jeans that she holds in this photograph. She has only worn the jeans three times, all in Syria - twice to wedding parties, and once when she went to visit her grandfather.;*;Salma, 24, and her family were forced to flee their home last summer. Confined to a wheelchair and blind in both eyes, she says she was terrified by what was happening around her. Salma says the only important thing that she brought with her "is my soul, nothing more - nothing material". When asked about her wheelchair, she seemed surprised, saying that she considers it an extension of her body, not an object.;*;Abdulaziz, 37, fled his home in Syria the night his neighbors were killed. The next day he used the majority of his savings to hire a truck to flee with his wife and his two sons. The most important thing that he was able to bring with him is the instrument he holds here. It is called a buzuq and he says that "playing it fills me with a sense of nostalgia and reminds me of my homeland".;*;Hisham, 37, and his family fled Syria early in 2012, paying a smuggler $1,100 to take them across the border. The most important thing Hisham was able to bring with him is the photograph of his wife that he holds here. "This is important," he says, "because she gave me this photo back home before we were married, during the time when we were dating. It always brings me great memories and reminds me of my happiest time back home in Syria.";*;Neda, approximately 100 years old (age between 90 and 107 according to family members), fled from her home last December when the apartments surrounding hers were destroyed. Crossing the border into Iraq was a very difficult process for her, and the journey on foot lasted the better part of a day. The most important thing she was able to bring with her is the ring that she displays here. When she was ten years old, her mother gave it to her from her death bed, saying, "Keep this ring and remember me.";*;Mohammed, 70, and his family fled Syria when their family home in Damascus was destroyed by a bomb. They escaped in the back of a truck after covering themselves with plastic sheeting. The most important thing Mohammed was able to bring with him is the cane that he holds in this photograph. He says that without it, he wouldn(***)t have been able to make the two-hour crossing on foot to the Iraqi border.;*;Abdullah, 43, the imam of the only mosque in the refugee camp he lives in in Iraq, fled with his family after being warned that armed groups were searching for him. The most important thing Abdullah was able to bring with him is the Koran that he holds in this photograph. As an imam, he says religion is the most important aspect of his life. Daylife ID:
1362569202869
Photographer:
Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol;*;Brian Sokol
Image Source:
UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR;*;UNHCR
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Syria refugeeshttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869en-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Wed, 06 Mar 2013 11:26:43 GMTWed, 06 Mar 2013 14:38:02 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=07HtaupbPW5cS

Yusuf and his family fled their home several months before this photograph was taken. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria is the mobile phone that he holds in this photograph. "With this, I'm able to call my father. We're close enough to Syria here that I can catch signal from the Syrian towers sometimes." The phone also holds photographs of family members who are still in Syria, which he is able to keep with him at all times.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=07HtaupbPW5cSBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Yusuf and his family fled their home several months before this photograph was taken. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria is the mobile phone that he holds in this photograph. "With this, I'm able to call my father. We're close enough to Syria here that I can catch signal from the Syrian towers sometimes." The phone also holds photographs of family members who are still in Syria, which he is able to keep with him at all times.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=02nv3LGaSQ2Xh

Abdul and his family fled from their apartment in Syria after his wife was shot in the street during cross-fire between armed groups. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria are the keys to his home that he holds in this photograph. Though he doesn't know whether the family's apartment is still standing, he dreams every day of returning home.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=02nv3LGaSQ2XhBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Abdul and his family fled from their apartment in Syria after his wife was shot in the street during cross-fire between armed groups. The most important thing he was able to bring from Syria are the keys to his home that he holds in this photograph. Though he doesn't know whether the family's apartment is still standing, he dreams every day of returning home.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=09jWbYsdLFec0

Tamara's home in Syria was partially destroyed in September, and the family decided their best chance of safety was to reach the Syrian-Turkish border. "When we left our house, we felt the sky was raining bullets," Tamara recalled. "We were moving from one shelter to another in order to protect ourselves." The most important thing that she was able to bring with her is her diploma. With it she will be able to continue her education in Turkey.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=09jWbYsdLFec0Brian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Tamara's home in Syria was partially destroyed in September, and the family decided their best chance of safety was to reach the Syrian-Turkish border. "When we left our house, we felt the sky was raining bullets," Tamara recalled. "We were moving from one shelter to another in order to protect ourselves." The most important thing that she was able to bring with her is her diploma. With it she will be able to continue her education in Turkey.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0dh00Erh0A0We

Ahmed, 82, and his wife Fatima, 67, fled from their home in August 2012 after their  neighbour was killed for asking soldiers why they had executed his son. The most important thing Ahmed was able to bring with him from Syria is his wife. "She's the best woman that I've met in my life," he says. "Even if I were to go back 55 years, I would choose you again."

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0dh00Erh0A0WeBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Ahmed, 82, and his wife Fatima, 67, fled from their home in August 2012 after their  neighbour was killed for asking soldiers why they had executed his son. The most important thing Ahmed was able to bring with him from Syria is his wife. "She's the best woman that I've met in my life," he says. "Even if I were to go back 55 years, I would choose you again."

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=02PAdbcaOseBS

Iman, 25, decided to flee with her son and daughter when she heard accounts of sexual harassment against women in her home city in Syria. The most important thing Iman was able to bring with her is the Koran that she holds here. She says religion is the most important aspect of her life, and that the Koran gives her a sense of protection. "As long as I have it with me, I'm connected to God," she says.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=02PAdbcaOseBSBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Iman, 25, decided to flee with her son and daughter when she heard accounts of sexual harassment against women in her home city in Syria. The most important thing Iman was able to bring with her is the Koran that she holds here. She says religion is the most important aspect of her life, and that the Koran gives her a sense of protection. "As long as I have it with me, I'm connected to God," she says.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0fHQfea3uK5fu

Marwa, 8, and her family arrived in a refugee camp in Iraq by foot. She says she wept as she made the journey through the cold, over a rough trail, as her mother carried her and her baby brother.  She is now attending school and says that she finally feels safe. The most important thing she was able to bring with her when she left are the bracelets she displays in this photograph.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0fHQfea3uK5fuBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Marwa, 8, and her family arrived in a refugee camp in Iraq by foot. She says she wept as she made the journey through the cold, over a rough trail, as her mother carried her and her baby brother.  She is now attending school and says that she finally feels safe. The most important thing she was able to bring with her when she left are the bracelets she displays in this photograph.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0315fVvafs5Ea

Amina, 9, lives with her family in an uninsulated, partially constructed home in Iraq. About 30 people share the cold, drafty space. The most important thing that Shadiya was able to bring with her are the jeans that she holds in this photograph. She has only worn the jeans three times, all in Syria - twice to wedding parties, and once when she went to visit her grandfather.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0315fVvafs5EaBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Amina, 9, lives with her family in an uninsulated, partially constructed home in Iraq. About 30 people share the cold, drafty space. The most important thing that Shadiya was able to bring with her are the jeans that she holds in this photograph. She has only worn the jeans three times, all in Syria - twice to wedding parties, and once when she went to visit her grandfather.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0fZLdLacq4f3P

Salma, 24, and her family were forced to flee their home last summer. Confined to a wheelchair and blind in both eyes, she says she was terrified by what was happening around her. Sherihan says the only important thing that she brought with her "is my soul, nothing more - nothing material". When asked about her wheelchair, she seemed surprised, saying that she considers it an extension of her body, not an object.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0fZLdLacq4f3PBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Salma, 24, and her family were forced to flee their home last summer. Confined to a wheelchair and blind in both eyes, she says she was terrified by what was happening around her. Sherihan says the only important thing that she brought with her "is my soul, nothing more - nothing material". When asked about her wheelchair, she seemed surprised, saying that she considers it an extension of her body, not an object.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=07Xcenn3Xn6DZ

Abdulaziz, 37, fled his home in Syria the night his neighbors were killed. The next day he used the majority of his savings to hire a truck to flee with his wife and his two sons. The most important thing that he was able to bring with him is the instrument he holds here. It is called a buzuq and he says that "playing it fills me with a sense of nostalgia and reminds me of my homeland".

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=07Xcenn3Xn6DZBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Abdulaziz, 37, fled his home in Syria the night his neighbors were killed. The next day he used the majority of his savings to hire a truck to flee with his wife and his two sons. The most important thing that he was able to bring with him is the instrument he holds here. It is called a buzuq and he says that "playing it fills me with a sense of nostalgia and reminds me of my homeland".

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0bD240RadrfU4

Hisham, 37, and his family fled Syria early in 2012, paying a smuggler $1,100 to take them across the border. The most important thing Hisham was able to bring with him is the photograph of his wife that he holds here. "This is important," he says, "because she gave me this photo back home before we were married, during the time when we were dating. It always brings me great memories and reminds me of my happiest time back home in Syria."

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0bD240RadrfU4Brian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Hisham, 37, and his family fled Syria early in 2012, paying a smuggler $1,100 to take them across the border. The most important thing Hisham was able to bring with him is the photograph of his wife that he holds here. "This is important," he says, "because she gave me this photo back home before we were married, during the time when we were dating. It always brings me great memories and reminds me of my happiest time back home in Syria."

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0ebMayC7kJgZk

Neda, approximately 100 years old (age between 90 and 107 according to family members), fled from her home last December when the apartments surrounding hers were destroyed. Crossing the border into Iraq was a very difficult process for her, and the journey on foot lasted the better part of a day. The most important thing she was able to bring with her is the ring that she displays here. When she was ten years old, her mother gave it to her from her death bed, saying, "Keep this ring and remember me."

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=0ebMayC7kJgZkBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Neda, approximately 100 years old (age between 90 and 107 according to family members), fled from her home last December when the apartments surrounding hers were destroyed. Crossing the border into Iraq was a very difficult process for her, and the journey on foot lasted the better part of a day. The most important thing she was able to bring with her is the ring that she displays here. When she was ten years old, her mother gave it to her from her death bed, saying, "Keep this ring and remember me."

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=007pfqh1dH0WJ

Mohammed, 70, and his family fled Syria when their family home in Damascus was destroyed by a bomb. They escaped in the back of a truck after covering themselves with plastic sheeting. And all 50 people on board were terrified, not believing that they would reach safety. The most important thing Mohammed was able to bring with him is the cane that he holds in this photograph. He says that without it, he wouldn't have been able to make the two-hour crossing on foot to the Iraqi border.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=007pfqh1dH0WJBrian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Mohammed, 70, and his family fled Syria when their family home in Damascus was destroyed by a bomb. They escaped in the back of a truck after covering themselves with plastic sheeting. And all 50 people on board were terrified, not believing that they would reach safety. The most important thing Mohammed was able to bring with him is the cane that he holds in this photograph. He says that without it, he wouldn't have been able to make the two-hour crossing on foot to the Iraqi border.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=09Ei3mn8WD8T4

Abdullah, 43, the imam of the only mosque in the refugee camp he lives in in Iraq, fled with his family after being warned that armed groups were searching for him. The most important thing Abdullah was able to bring with him is the Koran that he holds in this photograph. As an imam, he says religion is the most important aspect of his life.

Wed, 06 Mar 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1362569202869?image_id=09Ei3mn8WD8T4Brian SokolUNHCRAl Jazeera Upload Images

Abdullah, 43, the imam of the only mosque in the refugee camp he lives in in Iraq, fled with his family after being warned that armed groups were searching for him. The most important thing Abdullah was able to bring with him is the Koran that he holds in this photograph. As an imam, he says religion is the most important aspect of his life.



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