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In Pictures
In Pictures: Yasser Arafat's life
A chronicle of the Palestinian leader who brought his country's struggle for freedom to the world's attention.
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2012 15:45


Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority/GALLO/GETTY
A portrait of Yasser Arafat in the 1940s. Arafat was born on August 24, 1929 in Cairo, Egypt, to Palestinian parents. He spent most of his youth in Egypt, and is believed to have started smuggling weapons into Palestine, then under British mandate, in 1946.


Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority/GALLO/GETTY
Arafat moved to Kuwait in 1956 after fighting in the first Arab-Israeli War and finishing his engineering degree at the University of Fuad I (now Cairo University). In 1958, he and other Palestinian activists formed Fatah, a Palestinian nationalist group advocating armed struggle against Israel.


-/AFP
Arafat, left, sits with members of the Palestine Liberation Organisation, formed in 1964 as an umbrella union of groups fighting against Israel's takeover of Palestine. After 1967's Six-Day War, Arafat's Fatah gained prominence, and he became PLO chief in 1969.


Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority/GALLO/GETTY
Arafat (right) stands next to a machine gun in in Lebanon, where the PLO relocated after King Hussein expelled it from Jordan in 1971. It remained based in Lebanon until 1982, when the Israeli army invaded the country and forced the PLO to relocate to Tunisia.


Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority/GALLO/GETTY
The PLO was granted observer status at the UN in 1974 shortly after Arafat addressed the UN General Assembly, which then recognised the right of the Palestinian people to sovereignty.


Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority/GALLO/GETTY
Arafat, right, met with Saddam Hussein, then-president of Iraq, in October 1988. Two months later, Arafat recognised Israel's right to exist and renounced violence in a speech to the UN General Assembly, leading US President Ronald Reagan to lift a 13-year ban on talks with the PLO.


PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images
After the First Intifada (1987-1993), the PLO and Israel negotiated the Oslo Accords - intended to be a framework for future talks - which allowed Arafat to return to Gaza in July 1994. The deal established the Palestinian Authority, of which Arafat became president in 1996.


ERIK JOHANSEN/AFP
Folowing the Oslo Accords deal, Arafat (left), then-Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres (centre), and then-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin won the Nobel Peace Prize in December 1994.


AMR NABIL/AFP/Getty Images
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, left, and Arafat shake hands after signing an agreement on September 4, 1999, paving the way for talks on a permanent peace deal. In July 2000, nine days of talks at Camp David ended with Arafat and Barak failing to reach a lasting peace settlement.


ABBAS MOMANI/AFP/Getty Images
The Second Intifada, a period of intensified violence, began in late September 2000. In December 2001, Israel retaliated to a slew of suicide bombings by destroying much of Arafat's Ramallah headquarters, essentially forcing him into house arrest.


ATEF SAFADI/EPA
Responding to US pressure to have Arafat relinquish some of his power, the PA elected a prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, for the first time in April 2003. Abbas resigned the following September and was succeeded by Ahmed Qurei, but Arafat remained the primary decision maker.


Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority/GALLO/GETTY
Arafat died on November 11, 2004, after falling ill the previous month. For many, Arafat remains a powerful embodiment of the Palestinian cause, which he spearheaded for almost four decades.



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captions:
A portrait of Yasser Arafat in the 1940s. Arafat was born on August 24, 1929 in Cairo, Egypt, to Palestinian parents. He spent most of his youth in Egypt, and is believed to have started smuggling weapons into Palestine, then under British mandate, in 1946.;*;Arafat moved to Kuwait in 1956 after fighting in the first Arab-Israeli War and finishing his engineering degree at the University of Fuad I (now Cairo University). In 1958, he and other Palestinian activists formed Fatah, a Palestinian nationalist group advocating armed struggle against Israel.;*;Arafat, left, sits with members of the Palestine Liberation Organisation, formed in 1964 as an umbrella union of groups fighting against Israel(***)s takeover of Palestine. After 1967(***)s Six-Day War, Arafat(***)s Fatah gained prominence, and he became PLO chief in 1969.;*;Arafat (right) stands next to a machine gun in in Lebanon, where the PLO relocated after King Hussein expelled it from Jordan in 1971. It remained based in Lebanon until 1982, when the Israeli army invaded the country and forced the PLO to relocate to Tunisia. ;*;The PLO was granted observer status at the UN in 1974 shortly after Arafat addressed the UN General Assembly, which then recognised the right of the Palestinian people to sovereignty. ;*;Arafat, right, met with Saddam Hussein, then-president of Iraq, in October 1988. Two months later, Arafat recognised Israel(***)s right to exist and renounced violence in a speech to the UN General Assembly, leading US President Ronald Reagan to lift a 13-year ban on talks with the PLO. ;*;After the First Intifada (1987-1993), the PLO and Israel negotiated the Oslo Accords - intended to be a framework for future talks - which allowed Arafat to return to Gaza in July 1994. The deal established the Palestinian Authority, of which Arafat became president in 1996.;*;Folowing the Oslo Accords deal, Arafat (left), then-Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres (centre), and then-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin won the Nobel Peace Prize in December 1994.;*;Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, left, and Arafat shake hands after signing an agreement on September 4, 1999, paving the way for talks on a permanent peace deal. In July 2000, nine days of talks at Camp David ended with Arafat and Barak failing to reach a lasting peace settlement.;*;The Second Intifada, a period of intensified violence, began in late September 2000. In December 2001, Israel retaliated to a slew of suicide bombings by destroying much of Arafat(***)s Ramallah headquarters, essentially forcing him into house arrest.;*;Responding to US pressure to have Arafat relinquish some of his power, the PA elected a prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, for the first time in April 2003. Abbas resigned the following September and was succeeded by Ahmed Qurei, but Arafat remained the primary decision maker.;*;Arafat died on November 11, 2004, after falling ill the previous month. For many, Arafat remains a powerful embodiment of the Palestinian cause, which he spearheaded for almost four decades. Daylife ID:
1341131056082
Photographer:
Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority;*;Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority;*;-;*;Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority;*;Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority;*;Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority;*;PATRICK BAZ;*;ERIK JOHANSEN;*;AMR NABIL;*;ABBAS MOMANI;*;ATEF SAFADI;*;Courtesy of the Palestinian Authority
Image Source:
GALLO/GETTY;*;GALLO/GETTY;*;AFP;*;GALLO/GETTY;*;GALLO/GETTY;*;GALLO/GETTY;*;AFP/Getty Images;*;AFP;*;AFP/Getty Images;*;AFP/Getty Images;*;EPA;*;GALLO/GETTY
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
In Pictures: Yasser Arafat's lifehttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafaten-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Sun, 01 Jul 2012 08:24:18 GMTMon, 02 Jul 2012 10:38:43 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0dONfNUgsVgGQ

A portrait of Yasser Arafat in the 1940s. Arafat was born on August 24, 1929 in Cairo, Egypt, to Palestinian parents. He spent most of his youth in Egypt, and is believed to have started smuggling weapons into Palestine in 1946.

Mon, 02 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0dONfNUgsVgGQCourtesy of the Palestinian AuthorityGALLO/GETTYAl Jazeera Upload Images

A portrait of Yasser Arafat in the 1940s. Arafat was born on August 24, 1929 in Cairo, Egypt, to Palestinian parents. He spent most of his youth in Egypt, and is believed to have started smuggling weapons into Palestine in 1946.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=085w4BH4Kmc4f

Arafat moved to Kuwait in 1956 after fighting in the first Arab-Israeli War and finishing his engineering degree at the University of Fuad I (now Cairo University). In 1958, he and other Palestinian activists formed Fatah, a Palestinian nationalist group advocating armed struggle against Israel.

Mon, 02 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=085w4BH4Kmc4fCourtesy of the Palestinian AuthorityGALLO/GETTYAl Jazeera Upload Images

Arafat moved to Kuwait in 1956 after fighting in the first Arab-Israeli War and finishing his engineering degree at the University of Fuad I (now Cairo University). In 1958, he and other Palestinian activists formed Fatah, a Palestinian nationalist group advocating armed struggle against Israel.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=06pg60sdFB9yX

Arafat, left, sits with a Palestine Liberation Organisation spokesman. The PLO was established in 1964 as an umbrella organisation of groups fighting to free Palestine. After the Six-Day War in June 1967, Fatah emerged as the PLO's most prominent group, and Arafat rose to its head in 1969.

Mon, 09 Aug 2010 09:23:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=06pg60sdFB9yX-AFPGetty Images

Arafat, left, sits with a Palestine Liberation Organisation spokesman. The PLO was established in 1964 as an umbrella organisation of groups fighting to free Palestine. After the Six-Day War in June 1967, Fatah emerged as the PLO's most prominent group, and Arafat rose to its head in 1969.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0byheWg1IC7cZ

Arafat (right) stands next to a machine gun in in Lebanon, where the PLO relocated after King Hussein expelled it from Jordan in 1971. It remained based in Lebanon until 1982, when the Israeli army invaded the country and forced the PLO to relocate to Tunisia.

Mon, 02 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0byheWg1IC7cZCourtesy of the Palestinian AuthorityGALLO/GETTYAl Jazeera Upload Images

Arafat (right) stands next to a machine gun in in Lebanon, where the PLO relocated after King Hussein expelled it from Jordan in 1971. It remained based in Lebanon until 1982, when the Israeli army invaded the country and forced the PLO to relocate to Tunisia.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=09L33p7bbVfO8

The PLO was granted observer status at the UN in 1974 shortly after Arafat addressed the UN General Assembly, which then recognised the right of the Palestinian people to sovereignty.

Mon, 02 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=09L33p7bbVfO8Courtesy of the Palestinian AuthorityGALLO/GETTYAl Jazeera Upload Images

The PLO was granted observer status at the UN in 1974 shortly after Arafat addressed the UN General Assembly, which then recognised the right of the Palestinian people to sovereignty.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0cGU7w240pcmB

Arafat, right, met with Saddam Hussein, the former president of Iraq, in October 1988. Two months later, Arafat recognised Israel's right to exist and renounced violence in a speech to the UN General Assembly, leading US President Ronald Reagan to lift a 13-year ban on talks with the PLO.

Mon, 02 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0cGU7w240pcmBCourtesy of the Palestinian AuthorityGALLO/GETTYAl Jazeera Upload Images

Arafat, right, met with Saddam Hussein, the former president of Iraq, in October 1988. Two months later, Arafat recognised Israel's right to exist and renounced violence in a speech to the UN General Assembly, leading US President Ronald Reagan to lift a 13-year ban on talks with the PLO.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0f0gdZl8fI6fC

Arafat returned to Gaza in July 1994 after the PLO and Israel negotiated an agreement signed in Washington, DC in 1993 after the First Intifada of the late 1980s. The agreement established the Palestinian Authority, of which Arafat became president in 1996.

Mon, 04 Jun 2012 14:13:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0f0gdZl8fI6fCPATRICK BAZAFP/Getty ImagesGetty Images

Arafat returned to Gaza in July 1994 after the PLO and Israel negotiated an agreement signed in Washington, DC in 1993 after the First Intifada of the late 1980s. The agreement established the Palestinian Authority, of which Arafat became president in 1996.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0d2Kayt7eJh2N

On December 10, 1994, Arafat (left), former Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres (centre), and late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin posed after winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Tue, 08 Jun 2010 08:12:35 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0d2Kayt7eJh2NERIK JOHANSENAFPGetty Images

On December 10, 1994, Arafat (left), former Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres (centre), and late Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin posed after winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=03ZJ2I77tdfzh

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, left, and Arafat shake hands after signing an agreement on September 4, 1999, paving the way for talks on a permanent peace settlement. In July 2000, nine days of talks at Camp David ended with Arafat and Barak failing to reach a lasting peace settlement.

Thu, 30 Dec 2010 15:54:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=03ZJ2I77tdfzhAMR NABILAFP/Getty ImagesGetty Images

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak, left, and Arafat shake hands after signing an agreement on September 4, 1999, paving the way for talks on a permanent peace settlement. In July 2000, nine days of talks at Camp David ended with Arafat and Barak failing to reach a lasting peace settlement.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0gy4fW47B74Ia

In December 2001, a slew of suicide bombings lead Israel to retaliate by destroying much of Arafat's Ramallah headquarters, essentially forcing him into house arrest. The Second Intifada, a period of intensified Israeli-Palestinian tension, began in late September 2000.

Mon, 03 Jan 2011 16:19:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0gy4fW47B74IaABBAS MOMANIAFP/Getty ImagesGetty Images

In December 2001, a slew of suicide bombings lead Israel to retaliate by destroying much of Arafat's Ramallah headquarters, essentially forcing him into house arrest. The Second Intifada, a period of intensified Israeli-Palestinian tension, began in late September 2000.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=030IaPa1PRchG

Responding to US pressure to have Arafat relinquish some of his power, the PA elected a prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, for the first time in April 2003. Abbas resigned the following September and was succeeded by Ahmed Qurei, but Arafat remained the primary decision maker.

Thu, 10 Nov 2011 06:51:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=030IaPa1PRchGATEF SAFADIEPAEPA Images

Responding to US pressure to have Arafat relinquish some of his power, the PA elected a prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, for the first time in April 2003. Abbas resigned the following September and was succeeded by Ahmed Qurei, but Arafat remained the primary decision maker.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0bzM16RbiMf3S

Arafat died on November 11, 2004 after falling ill the previous month. For many, Arafat remains a powerful embodiment of the Palestinian cause, which he spearheaded for almost four decades.

Mon, 02 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Yasser-Arafat?image_id=0bzM16RbiMf3SCourtesy of the Palestinian AuthorityGALLO/GETTYAl Jazeera Upload Images

Arafat died on November 11, 2004 after falling ill the previous month. For many, Arafat remains a powerful embodiment of the Palestinian cause, which he spearheaded for almost four decades.



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