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In Pictures: Gulf spill agony
Doctors continue to treat people suffering from acute chemical exposure in aftermath of oil spill and toxic response.
Last Modified: 26 Feb 2013 08:34


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
Dr Riki Ott, a toxicologist, marine biologist and Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster survivor, told Al Jazeera that 2-butoxyethanol, a chemical resulting from BP's disaster, is "a human health hazard substance; it is a fetal toxin and it breaks down blood cells, causing blood and kidney disorders".


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
Lorrie Williams, a resident of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, has chemicals from BP's oil in her blood stream. She has lost 70 pounds in the past nine months, and fears she may not be alive for another year.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
Donny Matsler (centre), from Dauphin Island, Alabama, has extremely high levels of BP's chemicals in his blood, according to Dr William Rea at his clinic in Dallas, Texas, where Matsler was undergoing detoxification treatment.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
Daisy Seal, who lives near the coast of Mississippi, told Al Jazeera she "started having respiratory problems, a horrible skin rash, headaches, nosebleeds, low energy, and trouble sleeping. And I now feel like I'm dying from the inside out."


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
At a US Coast Guard contingency meeting in Mississippi last September, Al Jazeera was told that dispersants would continue to be used in the event of another oil spill.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
Jonathan Henderson, with the Gulf Restoration Network, has made more than 100 trips into the field to inspect the damage caused by BP's disaster, and continues to see evidence of oil along Gulf Coast beaches and marshlands.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
Dr William Rea established the Environmental Health Center in Dallas, Texas, to treat people who suffer from acute chemical exposure. Rea has treated many people from the Gulf Coast who have been made sick since BP's toxic chemicals were released.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
In the months following BP's disaster, it was common to see oil soaked boom hanging in place of shrimp nets, as thousands of fishermen enrolled in the Vessels of Opportunity (VOO) program that hired fishermen and their boats, allegedly to help clean up the oil.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
John Gooding, a resident of Pass Christian, Mississippi, began having health problems shortly after the oil disaster started. He has become more ill with each passing month, and has moved inland in an effort to escape what he believes is ongoing exposure to BP's chemicals.


Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera
According to the Centre for Biological Diversity, at least 6,000 sea turtles, 26,000 dolphins and whales, 82,000 birds, and countless fish have been killed or harmed by BP's disaster.



images:
/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298465860627_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298465969873_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/2012429846678167_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466203909_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466313140_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466422658_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466547342_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466688902_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466813684_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/4/29/20124298466938450_8.jpg
captions:
Dr Riki Ott, a toxicologist, marine biologist and Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster survivor, told Al Jazeera that 2-butoxyethanol, a chemical resulting from BP(***)s disaster, is "a human health hazard substance; it is a fetal toxin and it breaks down blood cells, causing blood and kidney disorders".;*;Lorrie Williams, a resident of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, has chemicals from BP(***)s oil in her blood stream. She has lost 70 pounds in the past nine months, and fears she may not be alive for another year.;*;Donny Matsler (centre), from Dauphin Island, Alabama, has extremely high levels of BP(***)s chemicals in his blood, according to Dr William Rea at his clinic in Dallas, Texas, where Matsler was undergoing detoxification treatment.;*;Daisy Seal, who lives near the coast of Mississippi, told Al Jazeera she "started having respiratory problems, a horrible skin rash, headaches, nosebleeds, low energy, and trouble sleeping. And I now feel like I(***)m dying from the inside out." ;*;At a US Coast Guard contingency meeting in Mississippi last September, Al Jazeera was told that dispersants would continue to be used in the event of another oil spill.;*;Jonathan Henderson, with the Gulf Restoration Network, has made more than 100 trips into the field to inspect the damage caused by BP(***)s disaster, and continues to see evidence of oil along Gulf Coast beaches and marshlands.;*;Dr William Rea established the Environmental Health Center in Dallas, Texas, to treat people who suffer from acute chemical exposure. Rea has treated many people from the Gulf Coast who have been made sick since BP(***)s toxic chemicals were released.;*;In the months following BP(***)s disaster, it was common to see oil soaked boom hanging in place of shrimp nets, as thousands of fishermen enrolled in the Vessels of Opportunity (VOO) program that hired fishermen and their boats, allegedly to help clean up the oil.;*;John Gooding, a resident of Pass Christian, Mississippi, began having health problems shortly after the oil disaster started. He has become more ill with each passing month, and has moved inland in an effort to escape what he believes is ongoing exposure to BP(***)s chemicals.;*;According to the Centre for Biological Diversity, at least 6,000 sea turtles, 26,000 dolphins and whales, 82,000 birds, and countless fish have been killed or harmed by BP(***)s disaster. Daylife ID:
1334916468311
Photographer:
Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld;*;Erika Blumenfeld
Image Source:
Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Gulf residents blame BPhttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BPen-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:07:47 GMTFri, 20 Apr 2012 13:54:18 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=060O5aD8wb9Um

Dr Riki Ott, a toxicologist, marine biologist and Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster survivor, told Al Jazeera that 2-butoxyethanol, a chemical resulting from BP's disaster, is "a human health hazard substance; it is a fetal toxin and it breaks down blood cells, causing blood and kidney disorders"

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=060O5aD8wb9UmErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Dr Riki Ott, a toxicologist, marine biologist and Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster survivor, told Al Jazeera that 2-butoxyethanol, a chemical resulting from BP's disaster, is "a human health hazard substance; it is a fetal toxin and it breaks down blood cells, causing blood and kidney disorders"

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=09k47N96vo0Se

Lorrie Williams, a resident of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, has chemicals from BP's oil in her blood stream. She has lost 70 pounds in the past nine months, and fears she may not be alive for another year

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=09k47N96vo0SeErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Lorrie Williams, a resident of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, has chemicals from BP's oil in her blood stream. She has lost 70 pounds in the past nine months, and fears she may not be alive for another year

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=044kesA0Ag5wN

Donny Matsler (centre), from Dauphin Island, Alabama, has extremely high levels of BP's chemicals in his blood, according to Dr William Rea at his clinic in Dallas, Texas, where Matsler was undergoing detoxification treatment

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=044kesA0Ag5wNErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Donny Matsler (centre), from Dauphin Island, Alabama, has extremely high levels of BP's chemicals in his blood, according to Dr William Rea at his clinic in Dallas, Texas, where Matsler was undergoing detoxification treatment

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=0ar5dnafmG2un

Daisy Seal, who lives near the coast of Mississippi, told Al Jazeera she "started having respiratory problems, a horrible skin rash, headaches, nosebleeds, low energy, and trouble sleeping. And I now feel like I'm dying from the inside out." The mother of an eight-year-old son has also had two miscarriages in the past year. She blames her health problems on BP's chemicals

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=0ar5dnafmG2unErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Daisy Seal, who lives near the coast of Mississippi, told Al Jazeera she "started having respiratory problems, a horrible skin rash, headaches, nosebleeds, low energy, and trouble sleeping. And I now feel like I'm dying from the inside out." The mother of an eight-year-old son has also had two miscarriages in the past year. She blames her health problems on BP's chemicals

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=01Gu0Hf6lJ30x

At a US Coast Guard contingency meeting in Mississippi last September, Al Jazeera was told that dispersants would continue to be used in the event of another oil spill

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=01Gu0Hf6lJ30xErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

At a US Coast Guard contingency meeting in Mississippi last September, Al Jazeera was told that dispersants would continue to be used in the event of another oil spill

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=08x3646f7D4DK

Jonathan Henderson, with the Gulf Restoration Network, has made more than 100 trips into the field to inspect the damage caused by BP's disaster, and continues to see evidence of oil along Gulf Coast beaches and marshlands

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=08x3646f7D4DKErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Jonathan Henderson, with the Gulf Restoration Network, has made more than 100 trips into the field to inspect the damage caused by BP's disaster, and continues to see evidence of oil along Gulf Coast beaches and marshlands

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=0drmeK7bSB9Nl

Dr William Rea established the Environmental Health Center in Dallas, Texas, to treat people who suffer from acute chemical exposure. Rea has treated many people from the Gulf Coast who have been made sick since BP's toxic chemicals were released

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=0drmeK7bSB9NlErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Dr William Rea established the Environmental Health Center in Dallas, Texas, to treat people who suffer from acute chemical exposure. Rea has treated many people from the Gulf Coast who have been made sick since BP's toxic chemicals were released

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=08mSdcTgcR9XI

In the months following BP's disaster, it was common to see oil soaked boom hanging in place of shrimp nets, as thousands of fishermen enrolled in the Vessels of Opportunity (VOO) program that hired fishermen and their boats, allegedly to help clean up the oil

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:10:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=08mSdcTgcR9XIErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

In the months following BP's disaster, it was common to see oil soaked boom hanging in place of shrimp nets, as thousands of fishermen enrolled in the Vessels of Opportunity (VOO) program that hired fishermen and their boats, allegedly to help clean up the oil

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=08mV8z246Y5b5

John Gooding, a resident of Pass Christian, Mississippi, began having health problems shortly after the oil disaster started. He has become more ill with each passing month, and has moved inland in an effort to escape what he believes is ongoing exposure to BP's chemicals

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=08mV8z246Y5b5Erika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

John Gooding, a resident of Pass Christian, Mississippi, began having health problems shortly after the oil disaster started. He has become more ill with each passing month, and has moved inland in an effort to escape what he believes is ongoing exposure to BP's chemicals

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=06q9gK42WK7lG

According to the Centre for Biological Diversity, at least 6,000 sea turtles, 26,000 dolphins and whales, 82,000 birds, and countless fish have been killed or harmed by BP's disaster

Fri, 20 Apr 2012 10:09:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gulf-residents-blame-BP?image_id=06q9gK42WK7lGErika BlumenfeldAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

According to the Centre for Biological Diversity, at least 6,000 sea turtles, 26,000 dolphins and whales, 82,000 birds, and countless fish have been killed or harmed by BP's disaster



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