In Pictures: Ongoing BP oil leaks in Gulf

Al Jazeera spots a swath of silvery oil sheen near BP's crippled Macondo well in the Gulf of Mexico.

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    Over one year after a BP oil well in the Gulf of Mexico leaked, causing one of the worst environmental disasters in US history, oil continues to surface on the water near the damaged well.

    On September 11 Al Jazeera reported and photographed a silvery oil sheen, about 7 km long and 10 to 50 metres wide, roughly 19 km northeast of the well.

     

    1) Scientists told Al Jazeera there are more oil seeps in this area of the Gulf of Mexico than they've ever seen [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

     

    2) The oil field nearby this seep, located 64 km off the coast of Louisiana, is believed to hold as much 50 million barrels of producible oil reserves [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

     

    3) BP has two research vessels where oil is seeping up into the Gulf of Mexico, at a location not far from their crippled Macondo well, the scene of their April 2010 oil disaster [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

     

    4) Scientists debate whether the new oil seeps near BP's Macondo well are natural or anthropogenic [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]


    5) The Skandi Neptune is once again seen in the vicinity of BP's Macondo well, where oil seeps, natural or manmade, continue to stain the surface of the Gulf [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

     

    6) Bonny Schumaker, pilot and director of On Wings of Care, has logged more than 500 hours tracking BP's oil in the Gulf of Mexico [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

     

    7) Al Jazeera flew to the area on Sunday September 11, and spotted a swath of silvery oil sheen, approximately 7 km long and 10 to 50 meters wide, at a location roughly 19 km northeast of the now capped Macondo 252 well [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

     

    8) While BP claims that the new seeps are not from their well, some scientists believe full, independent, and public investigations need to be conducted [Erika Blumenfeld/Al Jazeera]

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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