[QODLink]
Business
China 'recovers' from global slump
Growth accelerates to 10.7 per cent in last quarter but overheating worries emerge.
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2010 04:47 GMT
Data released on Thursday raised fears of possible overheating in the economy [Reuters]

China has declared itself the first major economy to recover from the global economic downturn as data showed economic growth accelerated to 10.7 per cent in the final quarter of 2009.

GDP for the whole year totalled 8.7 per cent according to government figures released on Thursday, easily beating targets.

However, the raft of data released by the National Bureau of Statistics also showed inflation picking up, adding to pressure on the government to prevent overheating in the economy.

"China has become the first, on the whole, to achieve recovery and stabilisation in its economy," Ma Jiantang, the bureau's commissioner, told reporters in Beijing.

But he added that in the face of ongoing "uncertainties" and a weak global outlook, the government would avoid major changes in economic policy.

The figures put China's total gross domestic output for 2009 at $4.9 trillion, bringing it closer to overtaking Japan as the world's number two economy after the US.

'Developing country'

Nonetheless, Ma stressed that China sees itself as a developing country with a wide income disparity between its urban and rural populations.

Average income for city dwellers in 2009 was $2,700, he said, while in the populous countryside it was just $752.

"Despite the increase in our GDP and economic strength, we still have to recognise that China is a developing country," Ma told a news conference. "We have to be keenly aware of that."

China's leaders have said stimulus spending will continue but are worried about rising prices and have ordered banks to curb lending after a record surge in 2009.

According to Thursday's figures, consumer prices picked up in the fourth quarter of 2009 after falling for much of the year.

Prices rose 0.6 per cent in November from a year earlier and spiked by 1.9 per cent in December.

"That's a huge jump," Ken Peng, an economist with Citigroup, told the Associated Press.

He said it was the sharpest one-month rise in inflation since February 2008, when China was suffering record consumer price hikes.

Peng said the data showed it was time for the government to call a halt to stimulus measures.

The spectre of inflation is especially politically sensitive in China, because rising prices erode the economic gains that the ruling Communist party has made the basis of its claim to power.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Featured on Al Jazeera
The author argues that in the new economy, it's people, not skills or majors, that have lost value.
Colleagues of detained Al Jazeera journalists press demands for their release, 100 days after their arrest in Egypt.
Mehdi Hasan discusses online freedoms and the potential of the web with Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.
A tight race seems likely as 814 million voters elect leaders in world's largest democracy next week.
Featured
After a sit-in protest at Poland's parliament, lawmakers are set to raise government aid to carers of disabled youth.
A vocal minority in Ukraine's east wants to join Russia, and Kiev has so far been unable to put down the separatists.
Iran's government has shifted its take on 'brain drain' but is the change enough to reverse the flow?
Deadly attacks on anti-mining activists in the Philippines part of a global trend, according to new report.
Activists say 'Honor Diaries' documentary exploits gender-based violence to further an anti-Islamic agenda.
join our mailing list