[QODLink]
Archive
Fallujans slam US raids
Residents of Falluja have taken to the streets after Friday prayers to denounce the continuous bombing of their homes and to support their city's security forces.
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2004 12:30 GMT
The site of a Falluja house bombed by US warplanes
Residents of Falluja have taken to the streets after Friday prayers to denounce the continuous bombing of their homes and to support their city's security forces.

Hundreds of protesters condemned the killing of civilians by US warplanes, calling US air raids a cowardly action and calling on US soldiers to fight them on the battlefield.

"Air strikes are cowardly. Get down and face us on the battlefield," the crowd chanted.

Shaikh Abd Allah al-Janabi, head of the Shura Council of the Falluja Mujahidin, addressed the crowd, warning that if war erupted again it would likely last until the last man standing.

"This war will be over, only with their dead bodies or ours, and, if they want it like this, welcome to death," he said.

On Wednesday, a US aerial assault targeted what the department of defence said was a Falluja safehouse for "wanted terrorists". However, Falluja hospital sources said 20 people, including women and children, were killed in their homes.

The US military has persistently said it is targeting hideouts of the Jordanian Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, whom the Americans hold responsible for dozens of attacks across Iraq.

Human sense

Al-Janabi and other speakers also condemned Iraqi government and US attempts to dismantle Falluja's security forces which were formed according to the agreement reached by US forces and Falluja notables following last April's confrontations.

Abd Allah al-Janabi warns of 
renewed war in Falluja

"If they [interim Iraqi government] still enjoy the least of human sense they must decide immediately, either they stand by their people's rights, or they submit their collective resignation," said al-Janabi, who enjoys a great base of support in the war-torn city.

Colonel Sabbar al-Janabi, who led the Falluja Brigade formed last April, attended the gathering and criticised US and Iraqi officials for violating the agreement with Fallujans.

"[The] US military wants us to disperse Falluja police which keeps stability in the city," he said.

He asked why a successful police force would be disbanded and open the way for criminals to re-emerge.

"Were there any reports about explosions or crimes in Falluja? They want us to follow their orders or they threaten to dissolve us."

No-go zone

The Falluja Brigade is believed to be comprised mostly of native Fallujans - some belonging to the ousted government's military and others derived from local fighters.

"Falluja security forces know the city and its people very well, it is a key factor behind their success"

Abd al-Qadir Muhammad, 
journalist from Falluja

The native composition of the brigade is believed to be the leading factor for its security success in the city, Fallujan residents say.

"Falluja security forces know the city and its people very well, it is a key factor behind their success," said Abd al-Qadir Muhammad, a journalist from the city.

Sources told Aljazeera.net that Colonel al-Janabi was dismissed and many of his men were suspended. 

The US military had no immediate comment, but it is believed they have struggled to find allies across the Sunni belt, west of the capital.

Falluja has become a no-go zone for US-led forces since an April offensive in the city ended with an agreement for Iraqis to police themselves and bring to justice hardcore members of Iraqi armed factions.

Source:
Aljazeera + Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.