Security fears as US plans Iraq exit

Some worry violence could return to the streets of Mosul, an ethnic tinderbox, when American forces leave the country.



    After years of conflict rooted in ethnic animosities, life in Mosul seems to be returning to normal for residents who say they have suffered under the US occupation and from armed groups.

    Since 2009 more than 30,000 Iraqi forces have been deployed across Nineveh province, with the US military providing support and advice.

    More than 2,100 policemen have been killed since 2003, according to Major-General Ahmed Hassan Al-Juboori, Nineveh's police chief, but he still believes his forces are ready and that Mosul is almost secured.

    By the end of 2011, all US troops stationed in Iraq will withdraw from the country. But with violence surging anew, US and Iraqi leaders are reconsidering the withdrawal.

    Al Jazeera's Omar Al Saleh reports from Mosul, in northern Iraq.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.