Protesters demand reform in Morocco

Demonstrators continue their bid for peaceful social and constitutional reform in the kingdom.

    Thousands of protesters have participated in rallies in cities across Morocco, demanding social and economic reforms. They called for an end to corruption, and want more jobs for the increasing number of university graduates who face joblessness.

    The peaceful protests are predominately working class in tone, demanding constitutional reforms and new parliamentary elections.

    The marches on Sunday were organised by the February 20 movement, which has led protests for the past two months, with support from Morocco's best-known Islamist movement, Adl wal Ihsan, which is barred from politics in the North African kingdom.

    Morocco's King Mohammed VI has already pledged changes to the constitution for the first time in 15 years, but protesters remain sceptical about the possibility of real change.

    Al Jazeera's Caroline Malone reports.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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