All-Swiss affair in Monte Carlo

Stanislas Wawrinka beats David Ferrer, while Roger Federer ousts Novak Djokovic to set up an all-Swiss final.

    Wawrinka remains on course for the fourth title of his career on clay and his first in any Masters event [Reuters]
    Wawrinka remains on course for the fourth title of his career on clay and his first in any Masters event [Reuters]

    Australian Open champion Stanislas Wawrinka reached the Monte Carlo Masters final after beating Spaniard David Ferrer 6-1, 7-6 (3) to set up a possible all-Swiss decider against Roger Federer.

    Although the third-seeded Wawrinka made a string of unforced errors he hit far more winners (31-8) in beating Ferrer for the third straight match.

    Ferrer, the 2011 runner-up, rarely troubled Wawrinka, forcing only two break-point chances in the match.

    "I know when I'm moving well and I can dictate the game, I'm always good against him." Wawrinka said.

    Sixth-seeded Ferrer looked in good form when he beat eight-time champion Rafael Nadal in the quarterfinals, but was unable to withstand Wawrinka's aggressive approach, and spent much of the match pinned behind the baseline.

    Wawrinka remains on course for his third title of the season, the fourth of his career on clay and his first in any Masters event.

    He moved 5-2 in the tiebreaker with a drop shot that Ferrer could not reach and clinched victory on his second match point when the Spaniard rushed a two-handed backhand that hit the net.

    The 29-year-old Wawrinka has six career titles but has lost his previous two Masters finals on clay at Madrid last year and in Rome six years ago to Djokovic.

    Federer beats Djokovic

    Roger Federer beat an injured Novak Djokovic 7-5 6-2 to set up an all-Swiss Monte Carlo Masters final with Stanislas Wawrinka after the Australian Open champion ousted David Ferrer 6-1 7-6 (3).

    Holder Djokovic resisted for one set before pain in his right wrist was just too much to bear for the second-seeded Serb who bowed out on the first match point after one hour 14 minutes.

    The much-awaited clash lived up to expectations early on, with 17-times grand slam champion Federer saving two set points on serve at 5-4.

    Federer, who has never won the Monte Carlo Masters, broke in the following game and pocketed the set with an ace before Djokovic went to his chair holding his right wrist.

    The second set was a stroll for the Swiss who produced a series of forehand winners as he moved 18-16 up in his head-to-head record against Djokovic.

     

     

     

    SOURCE: AP


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