How did the QAnon conspiracy go global?

For people outside the US, QAnon seemed like a uniquely American threat – until it wasn’t.

Romanian supporters of QAnon shout slogans against the government's measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infections, like wearing a face mask, during a rally in Bucharest on Monday, August 10, 2020. QAnon is a US conspiracy theory popular among some Trump supporters (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda) (AP Photo)
Romanian supporters of QAnon shout slogans against the government's measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infections, like wearing a face mask, during a rally in Bucharest on Monday, August 10, 2020. QAnon is a US conspiracy theory popular among some Trump supporters (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda) (AP Photo)

For people outside the US, QAnon seemed like a uniquely American threat – until it wasn’t. The digital cult was born on the internet in 2017, but its adherents have taken offline action in several countries. So how does a baseless conspiracy theory that says Donald Trump is battling a cabal of child-trafficking elites find its way around the world?

In this episode:

Aoife Gallagher, analyst at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue; Rudy Bouma, journalist at Nieuwsuur

Connect with The Take: 

Twitter (@AJTheTake), Instagram (@ajthetake) and Facebook (@TheTakePod)

Subscribe:

New episodes of the show come out every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Subscribe to The Take on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle PodcastsStitcher or wherever you listen.

The team:

Negin Owliaei produced this episode with Dina Kesbeh, Alexandra Locke, Ney Alvarez, Amy Walters, Priyanka Tilve, Josh Rushing, and Malika Bilal.

Alex Roldan was the sound designer. Natalia Aldana is the engagement producer. Stacey Samuel is The Take’s executive producer.

Source: Al Jazeera

Related

More from News
Most Read