'Al-Qaeda' kills Yemen intelligence officer

Security official says Colonel Marwan al-Maqbali was shot by gunmen in the southern city of Aden.

    Suspected Al-Qaeda gunmen killed an intelligence officer in the south Yemen port city of Aden, a security official said.

    Colonel Marwan al-Maqbali was leaving his house on Thursday in Al-Qalua neighbourhood when he was fired on from a car carrying gunmen "suspected of belonging to Al-Qaeda", the official said.

    Two bullets hit Maqbali who died before reaching hospital, and his assailants escaped, the source added.

    Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has been blamed for most of the increasingly common hit-and-run strikes targeting military personnel and officials.

    The armed group rarely claims responsibility for such attacks, but did admit being behind a brazen daylight assault on the defence ministry in Sanaa that killed 56 people on December 5.

    AQAP took advantage of a decline in central government control during Yemen's 2011 uprising to seize large parts of the territory across the south.

    The fighters were driven back in June 2012 by a military offensive and the group has been further weakened by US drone strikes.

    AQAP is considered by Washington to be the most dangerous affiliate of the Al-Qaeda network.

    SOURCE: AFP


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