Syria 'accepts' Annan plan to end strife

Spokesman for ex-UN chief says Damascus has agreed to accept six-point peace plan for ending conflict in country.

     

    The Syrian government has agreed to accept the joint UN-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan's six-point plan on ending the violence in Syria, the former UN chief's spokesman has said.

    "The Syrian government has written to the joint special envoy Kofi Annan, accepting his six-point plan, endorsed by the United Nations Security Council," spokesman Ahmad Fawzi said in a statement on Tuesday.

    "Mr Annan views this as an important initial step that could bring an end  to the violence and the bloodshed, provide aid to the suffering, and create an environment conducive to a political dialogue that would fulfil the legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people," he added.

    Annan, who is in China to seek Beijing's support for his peace proposal, has written to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad asking Damascus to "put its commitments into immediate effect".

    Al Jazeera's Rula Amin reporting from Beirut said: "The acceptance by Syria of the plan is very significant, but the question will be if the Syrian opposition now accepts it,"

    Assad visits Homs

    Syria's state-run news agency says Assad has travelled to the country's Baba Amr neighborhood in Homs, a former opposition group stronghold.

    Baba Amr was the site of a monthlong siege by government forces who battled rebel fighters before driving them out.

    Hundreds of people were killed in the fighting there.

    The UN says more than 8,000 people have been killed in Syria's year long uprising against Assad's rule.


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