Colour runs riot as India celebrates Holi

Revellers pour onto streets across the country, smearing and splashing others with colour to mark start of spring.

    Holi is primarily celebrated in India, Nepal and other countries with large Hindu populations [Al Jazeera]
    Holi is primarily celebrated in India, Nepal and other countries with large Hindu populations [Al Jazeera]

    Millions of Indians splashed bright colours on each other to celebrate the popular Hindu festival of Holi, which marks the start of spring.

    The 'Festival of Colours' saw revellers pour onto streets across the country on Monday, smearing and splashing powder, known as 'gulal', and water on others to celebrate the triumph of good over evil.

    Many politicians, including ruling Congress party chief Sonia Gandhi, jubilantly celebrated Holi covered in fluorescent hues with party workers, family and friends.

    "May the festival bring health, happiness and prosperity to all," Prime Minister Manmohan Singh wished the country of 1.2 billion people in a statement on his website.

    Opposition prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi greeted Indians on mobile phones with an audio message, in which he urged voters to change the fate of the world's largest democracy when it goes to polls next month.

    "The country has been submerged into the colour of elections. Election is the festival of Holi for the democracy. Let's celebrate this festival of democracy to change the fate of India," Modi said in his audio message. 

    In the capital New Delhi, neighbourhoods were splattered in a rainbow of colours as people from all walks of life playfully chased each other with water guns, water balloons and spray paint and danced to the beat of drums in clouds of flying powder.

    Holi falls on the last full moon day of the lunar month at the end of winter.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    Survivor stories from Super Typhoon Haiyan

    The Philippines’ Typhoon Haiyan was the strongest storm ever to make landfall. Five years on, we revisit this story.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    We Are Still Here: A Story from Native Alaska

    From Qatar to Alaska, a personal journey exploring what it means to belong when your culture is endangered.