China's rhino-horn farms enrage activists

Conservation groups report rhinos from South Africa being bred in captivity so horns can be harvested.

    Animal rights activists in China are saying that rhinos coming from South Africa are being bred in captivity so that their horns can be harvested for commercial trade in China.

    The trade in rhino horns, which are worth more in weight than gold, is illegal. China is one of the signatories to an international treaty drawn up in 1973 to protect wildlife against exploitation.

    Traditional Chinese medicine, however, purports that rhino horns are a cure-all for ailments ranging from headaches to cancer.

    Despite a ban by authorities, conservationists say rhino horns are still available on the back-shelves of traditional pharmacies.

    Al Jazeera’s Marga Ortigas reports from Hong Kong.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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