Australia 'failing to protect koalas'

Environmentalists say government is only taking half-measures in protecting threatened species.

    In a recent move by the government, Australia now considers koalas to be a threatened species, but only in some areas of the country.

    In the last 20 years, the koala population has dropped by 40 per cent in the state of Queensland and by a third in New South Wales.

    It is in those states, as well as the Australian Capital Territory, that they are deemed to need protection.

    Conservationists say the move is only a partial victory, and have accused the ministry of the environment of introducing half-measures.

    Tony Burke, the federal environment minister, has said the decision is justified because koala numbers are stable in other parts of the country.

    The ruling was made after a three-year study by the Threatened Species Scientific Committee.

    Al Jazeera's Florence Looi reports.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    'We will cut your throats': The anatomy of Greece's lynch mobs

    The brutality of Greece's racist lynch mobs

    With anti-migrant violence hitting a fever pitch, victims ask why Greek authorities have carried out so few arrests.

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    The rise of Pakistan's 'burger' generation

    How a homegrown burger joint pioneered a food revolution and decades later gave a young, politicised class its identity.

    From Cameroon to US-Mexico border: 'We saw corpses along the way'

    'We saw corpses along the way'

    Kombo Yannick is one of the many African asylum seekers braving the longer Latin America route to the US.