Thai park crocodiles at large after floods

Park owners scramble to recapture reptiles after they made a break for freedom, 100km southeast of capital Bangkok.

    Million Years Stone Park says it has the largest population of salt water crocodiles in Thailand [EPA]

    Dozens of crocodiles have escaped from a zoo and reptile farm in Thailand after floods swept their habitat, a park spokesman said.

    Suthawut Temtub said on Tuesday that 28 crocodiles from Million Years Stone Park and Crocodile Farm, which is 100km southeast of the capital, Bangkok, had been recaptured since breaking away from the park enclosure on Sunday night.

    He said the farm houses more than 2,000 crocodiles, ranging from 2 to 4 metres in length, and it was not yet known how many were missing.

    Heavy downpours over the weekend caused flooding in Thailand's east, including areas around Pattaya.

    Farm workers and locals had joined in the search for the missing reptiles.

    Thai television ran images of large crocodiles being returned to the farm with their jaws tied shut and carried by up to six men.

    Crocodiles can be dangerous to humans and notices are usually put up on farms and zoos warning visitors.

    On its website, the Million Years Stone Park says it has the "largest population of salt water crocodiles in this country" as well as smaller fresh water crocodiles and other exotic animals.

    Crocodiles are bred for their skins which can be used to make handbags and shoes.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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