Key points of UN resolution

Landmark UN Security Council resolution aims to rid planet of nuclear weapons.

    Under the resolution, NPT states must pursue talks on nuclear arms reduction and disarmament and on a treaty for complete disarmament under strict international monitoring [AFP]

    The 15-member UN security council unanimously has adopted a US-sponsored resolution aimed at reducing nuclear weapons around the world.

    In line with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), it comprises the following key points:

    State parties to the NPT must comply fully with all their obligations and fulfil their commitments under the treaty.

    States that are not parties to the NPT must accede to the treaty as non-nuclear weapons states.

    NPT states must pursue negotiations on steps relating to nuclear arms reduction and disarmament and on a treaty on complete disarmament under strict international monitoring.

    All other states must join the effort.

    NPT states must cooperate to ensure the NPT review conference next year not only bolsters the treaty but sets realistic goals in the areas of non-proliferation, the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and disarmament.

    Nuclear terrorism

    All states must refrain from nuclear test explosions as well as sign and ratify the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.

    The conference on disarmament must negotiate a treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or similiar devices as soon as possible.

    NPT member states must share best practices in order to improve safety standards and aim within four years to secure all nuclear material from the risk of nuclear terrorism.

    All states should minimise as much as economically and technically feasible the use of highly enriched uranium for civilian purposes.

    They should work to convert research reactors and radioisotope production processes to the use of low enriched uranium fuels.

    All states must improve their national capabilities to detect, deter and disrupt illicit trafficking in nuclear materials throughout their territories.

    SOURCE: Agencies


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